Feeds

Symbian shares the source

Go open source early

Intelligent flash storage arrays

The Symbian Foundation has announced it will be sharing the last of its source code today, putting the most widespread mobile OS under the Eclipse licence.

The Foundation reckons there are 330 million handsets out there running Symbian, and it's been working for the last couple of years to get ^3 (as version 3 is termed) opened up with the work now completed ahead of schedule.

Getting a proprietary OS opened up isn't just a matter of changing the licence: many companies contributed to Symbian over the years, and every contributor had to be negotiated with, or have their contribution worked around, by members of the Symbian community.

That community is still largely composed of drafted in Nokia employees, though the long-term goal is to spread the love more broadly. Various luminaries were brought out to congratulate Symbian on its sterling work - the most notable being Samsung which provided a supporting quote on the same day as demonstrating its first Bada handset in Korea, demonstrating how far its endorsement of the Symbian platform actually goes.

When Nokia bought out its partners in Symbian, and announced the formation of the Foundation with its plan to open-source the whole OS, the schedule called for all 108 packages to be opened up by the middle of 2010, so the project is ahead of schedule. That might be simply because it proved less complicated than expected, but it would be churlish not to recognise the work that's gone into the project.

So Symbian is now as free as Android, with a huge installed user base and a decade of successful deployments behind it: shame it hasn't got a brand like Google to push it into the limelight. ®

Security for virtualized datacentres

More from The Register

next story
TEEN RAMPAGE: Kids in iPhone 6 'Will it bend' YouTube 'prank'
iPhones bent in Norwich? As if the place wasn't weird enough
Consumers agree to give up first-born child for free Wi-Fi – survey
This Herod network's ace – but crap reception in bullrushes
Crouching tiger, FAST ASLEEP dragon: Smugglers can't shift iPhone 6s
China's grey market reports 'sluggish' sales of Apple mobe
Sea-Me-We 5 construction starts
New sub cable to go live 2016
New EU digi-commish struggles with concepts of net neutrality
Oettinger all about the infrastructure – but not big on substance
EE coughs to BROKEN data usage metrics BLUNDER that short-changes customers
Carrier apologises for 'inflated' measurements cockup
Comcast: Help, help, FCC. Netflix and pals are EXTORTIONISTS
The others guys are being mean so therefore ... monopoly all good, yeah?
Surprise: if you work from home you need the Internet
Buffer-rage sends Aussies out to experience road rage
prev story

Whitepapers

A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Beginner's guide to SSL certificates
De-mystify the technology involved and give you the information you need to make the best decision when considering your online security options.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.