Feeds

Symbian shares the source

Go open source early

The essential guide to IT transformation

The Symbian Foundation has announced it will be sharing the last of its source code today, putting the most widespread mobile OS under the Eclipse licence.

The Foundation reckons there are 330 million handsets out there running Symbian, and it's been working for the last couple of years to get ^3 (as version 3 is termed) opened up with the work now completed ahead of schedule.

Getting a proprietary OS opened up isn't just a matter of changing the licence: many companies contributed to Symbian over the years, and every contributor had to be negotiated with, or have their contribution worked around, by members of the Symbian community.

That community is still largely composed of drafted in Nokia employees, though the long-term goal is to spread the love more broadly. Various luminaries were brought out to congratulate Symbian on its sterling work - the most notable being Samsung which provided a supporting quote on the same day as demonstrating its first Bada handset in Korea, demonstrating how far its endorsement of the Symbian platform actually goes.

When Nokia bought out its partners in Symbian, and announced the formation of the Foundation with its plan to open-source the whole OS, the schedule called for all 108 packages to be opened up by the middle of 2010, so the project is ahead of schedule. That might be simply because it proved less complicated than expected, but it would be churlish not to recognise the work that's gone into the project.

So Symbian is now as free as Android, with a huge installed user base and a decade of successful deployments behind it: shame it hasn't got a brand like Google to push it into the limelight. ®

The essential guide to IT transformation

More from The Register

next story
6 Obvious Reasons Why Facebook Will Ban This Article (Thank God)
Clampdown on clickbait ... and El Reg is OK with this
So, Apple won't sell cheap kit? Prepare the iOS garden wall WRECKING BALL
It can throw the low cost race if it looks to the cloud
Time Warner Cable customers SQUEAL as US network goes offline
A rude awakening: North Americans greeted with outage drama
Shoot-em-up: Sony Online Entertainment hit by 'large scale DDoS attack'
Games disrupted as firm struggles to control network
BT customers face broadband and landline price hikes
Poor punters won't be affected, telecoms giant claims
EE plonks 4G in UK Prime Minister's backyard
OK, his constituency. Brace yourself for EXTRA #selfies
prev story

Whitepapers

Top 10 endpoint backup mistakes
Avoid the ten endpoint backup mistakes to ensure that your critical corporate data is protected and end user productivity is improved.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Backing up distributed data
Eliminating the redundant use of bandwidth and storage capacity and application consolidation in the modern data center.
The essential guide to IT transformation
ServiceNow discusses three IT transformations that can help CIOs automate IT services to transform IT and the enterprise
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.