Feeds

Intel mobile graphics in 3x boost

If only briefly

High performance access to file storage

Intel uncloaked a few more details on Wednesday about its line of consumer-level 32nm Westmere processors, which were previewed late last year and formally announced at last month's Consumer Electronics Show.

While most details of the Westmere consumer processors - known in marketing parlance as the Core i3/i5/i7 line - were already known, one nugget discussed today caught our interest: There's a speed boost available to the on-package HD Graphics cores in the mobile versions of the Core i3/i5/i7 parts that's similar to the Intel Turbo Boost Technology available in the Core i5 and i7 compute cores.

Intel Dynamic Frequency graphics boost

Dynamic Frequency's graphics goose - mobile processors only

Turbo Boost allows a chip to both boost a core's clock speed when an app needs some help and also save power by shutting down unneeded cores when an app isn't taking advantage of them. The graphics equivalent, called Dynamic Frequency, performs the same boost mojo for Westmere's integrated 45nm graphics die.

Turbo Boost is incremented in 133MHz "bins," with a maximum increase of eight bins, provided that the chip stays within its power and thermal specs. Dynamic Frequency, according to Intel, can provide the HD Graphics core with an up-to-3X frequency increase in graphics-intensive bursts.

These details were revealed in a conference call with reporters in preparation for Intel's participation in next week's International Solid-State Circuits Conference, to be held in San Francisco. An Intel rep told The Reg that the Dynamic Frequency feature had been discussed with certain product reviewers at CES, but this is the first time it has been highlighted in a company presentation.

In addition to the graphics-boosting oomph of the mobile line's Dynamic Frequency capabiliaty, Intel engineer Nasser Kurd also emphasized two of the Westmere processors' new power-saving features. First, the chips' L3 cache and queues - elements of what chip folks call a processor's "uncore" - can also be powered down when the cores are idling. Second, and unlike the previous Nehalem architecture, the chips now now include SRAM that's dedicated to saving a core's state, which removes the need for keeping the last-level cache powered up when the core is idle.

More details are certain to emerge during the ISSCC deep-geek presentations and discussions next week. ®

High performance access to file storage

More from The Register

next story
Report: Apple seeking to raise iPhone 6 price by a HUNDRED BUCKS
'Well, that 5c experiment didn't go so well – let's try the other direction'
Video games make you NASTY AND VIOLENT
Especially if you are bad at them and keep losing
Microsoft lobs pre-release Windows Phone 8.1 at devs who dare
App makers can load it before anyone else, but if they do they're stuck with it
Zucker punched: Google gobbles Facebook-wooed Titan Aerospace
Up, up and away in my beautiful balloon flying broadband-bot
Nvidia gamers hit trifecta with driver, optimizer, and mobile upgrades
Li'l Shield moves up to Android 4.4.2 KitKat, GameStream comes to notebooks
Gimme a high S5: Samsung Galaxy S5 puts substance over style
Biometrics and kid-friendly mode in back-to-basics blockbuster
AMD unveils Godzilla's graphics card – 'the world's fastest, period'
The Radeon R9 295X2: Water-cooled, 5,632 stream processors, 11.5TFLOPS
Sony battery recall as VAIO goes out with a bang, not a whimper
The perils of having Panasonic as a partner
NORKS' own smartmobe pegged as Chinese landfill Android
Fake kit in the hermit kingdom? That's just Kim Jong-un-believable!
prev story

Whitepapers

Mainstay ROI - Does application security pay?
In this whitepaper learn how you and your enterprise might benefit from better software security.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Mobile application security study
Download this report to see the alarming realities regarding the sheer number of applications vulnerable to attack, as well as the most common and easily addressable vulnerability errors.