Feeds

Dell floats new line of lighter, pared-down servers

Little fluffy CloudEdge

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup

Dell is planning a line of stripped down CloudEdge servers - standardised versions of its custom hyperscale data centre servers - for applications that work round fail-in-place hardware.

As reported the new servers will be pared down for lower operational and acquisition costs by foregoing things like redundant power supplies and fans. They will resemble the specialised servers Dell builds in the tens of thousands a year for customer data centres like Microsoft Azure and Facebook.

Dell reckons it can sell productised versions of these in lesser numbers, perhaps thousands a year, to very large - but not hyperscale - data centres for private and public cloud deployments. The data centre infrastructure and the applications would need to cope with individual server failure and route workloads around failed-in-place hardware. The benefits are lower energy costs and space savings. These servers are not for standard database and enterprise resource planning applications.

More information on these servers, such as the sales channel, is likely to come in the next quarter of the year. ®

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup

Whitepapers

Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Endpoint data privacy in the cloud is easier than you think
Innovations in encryption and storage resolve issues of data privacy and key requirements for companies to look for in a solution.
Why cloud backup?
Combining the latest advancements in disk-based backup with secure, integrated, cloud technologies offer organizations fast and assured recovery of their critical enterprise data.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?