Feeds

Amazon deletes a 6th of its catalogue in book price barney

Accuses Macmillan of 'a monopoly over own titles'

Intelligent flash storage arrays

Amazon.com removed all Macmillan books and ebooks from its US site over the weekend when it didn't get its own way over price negotiations.

The titles have now been restored but were unavailable for most of the weekend after Macmillan pushed for an increase in e-book titles from $9.99 to $14.99, and Amazon objected to the move. The company is not commenting on why it took the action except for an anonymous blog post after the event which said the bookseller had capitulated to the publisher.

The post, which went up on Sunday afternoon, said: "We will have to capitulate and accept Macmillan's terms because Macmillan has a monopoly over their own titles, and we will want to offer them to you even at prices we believe are needlessly high for e-books."

Many titles were still available from third parties on Amazon which makes the decision seem even more surreal - neither Macmillan nor Amazon will comment at this time.

Macmillan's chief executive John Sargent said he told Amazon on Thursday he wanted to move to an agency model in early March. This would effectively make Amazon another retailer, with a 30 per cent commission on titles sold.

Prices would change over time but most titles would be available electronically on the same day as hardback editions for between $12.99 and $14.99. Sargent said the new deal would allow Amazon to make more from Macmillan titles than in the past.

Amazon is trying to protect its share of the supply chain in the face of upcoming competition from Apple's tablet device.

Charlie Stross has an interesting take on this from an author's viewpoint here. ®

Security for virtualized datacentres

More from The Register

next story
TEEN RAMPAGE: Kids in iPhone 6 'Will it bend' YouTube 'prank'
iPhones bent in Norwich? As if the place wasn't weird enough
Consumers agree to give up first-born child for free Wi-Fi – survey
This Herod network's ace – but crap reception in bullrushes
Crouching tiger, FAST ASLEEP dragon: Smugglers can't shift iPhone 6s
China's grey market reports 'sluggish' sales of Apple mobe
Sea-Me-We 5 construction starts
New sub cable to go live 2016
New EU digi-commish struggles with concepts of net neutrality
Oettinger all about the infrastructure – but not big on substance
EE coughs to BROKEN data usage metrics BLUNDER that short-changes customers
Carrier apologises for 'inflated' measurements cockup
Comcast: Help, help, FCC. Netflix and pals are EXTORTIONISTS
The others guys are being mean so therefore ... monopoly all good, yeah?
Surprise: if you work from home you need the Internet
Buffer-rage sends Aussies out to experience road rage
prev story

Whitepapers

A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Beginner's guide to SSL certificates
De-mystify the technology involved and give you the information you need to make the best decision when considering your online security options.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.