Feeds

Sun takes over MoD's UFO bureau

Martian eggface prof Pillinger endorses soaraway plan

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

Renowned British tabloid the Sun has pledged to take on the task of running the nation's UFO-report bureau after cash-strapped Ministry of Defence chiefs closed it down last year. The paper says its public-spirited move has been endorsed by famous Mars-prang eggface prof Colin Pillinger.

The Currant Bun proudly announces Pillinger's backing - and that of NASA boffin Christopher McKay - in a searing report today. Giving background, the tabloid says:

Ministry of Defence chiefs secretly axed the department that investigated UFOs last month.

The axing wasn't actually very secret, having been announced on the MoD website. Nor did the "department" - actually a single low-ranking desk officer - "investigate" anything: it merely recorded UFO reports sent in to it. But no matter. "The Sun has picked up the baton" in a "bold bid to record alien activity in the UK".

"The Sun is right to keep the UFO files going," Professor Pillinger told the paper. Pillinger is most famous for his personal leadership of the Beagle 2 Mars lander project, which saw the £44m machine - after a colossally expensive journey to the red planet aboard a European spacecraft - completely cock up its mission, failing to make radio contact after being dropped towards the Martian surface. Its fate remains unknown to this day.

But the unlucky prof reckons that Sun-readers might help fill the gap in Blighty's knowledge of outer space.

"You have an army of readers who could flag up something extraordinary," he told the paper.

"Even if it is not alien life, it could be a meteorite which are of great value to the scientific community.

"Just because we do not understand something does not mean it is not true."

NASA boffin Chris McKay - famed for advocating plans to "bring Mars back to life" and described by the paper as "a NASA extra-terrestrial investigator" - also endorsed the Currant Bun's UFO service.

"I think it is only natural as a human to wander [sic] whether there is life outside of Earth," he apparently said. ®

Boost IT visibility and business value

More from The Register

next story
Our LOHAN spaceplane ballocket Kickstarter climbs through £8000
Through 25 per cent but more is needed: Get your UNIQUE rewards!
Cutting cancer rates: Data, models and a happy ending?
How surgery might be making cancer prognoses worse
Boffins ID freakish spine-smothered prehistoric critter: The CLAW gave it away
Bizarre-looking creature actually related to velvet worms
CRR-CRRRK, beep, beep: Mars space truck backs out of slippery sand trap
Curiosity finds new drilling target after course correction
SpaceX prototype rocket EXPLODES over Texas. 'Tricky' biz, says Elon Musk
No injuries or near injuries. Flight stayed in designated area
Brit balloon bod Bodnar overflies North Pole
B-64 amateur ultralight payload approaching second circumnavigation
Galileo, Galileo! Galileo, Galileo! Galileo fit to go. Magnifico
I'm just a poor boy, nobody loves me. But at least I can find my way with ESA GPS by 2017
Astronomers scramble for obs on new comet
Amateur gets fifth confirmed discovery
prev story

Whitepapers

Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup
IT departments are embracing cloud backup, but there’s a lot you need to know before choosing a service provider. Learn all the critical things you need to know.
Why and how to choose the right cloud vendor
The benefits of cloud-based storage in your processes. Eliminate onsite, disk-based backup and archiving in favor of cloud-based data protection.
Top 8 considerations to enable and simplify mobility
In this whitepaper learn how to successfully add mobile capabilities simply and cost effectively.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?