Feeds

Oracle hands out love and handcuffs to Sunware

Hello, Java. So long, Kenai

Build a business case: developing custom apps

A good use of $387m

Oracle will continue selling its own line of existing integration and SOA software to new customers instead of offering Java CAPs.

Java CAPs was the Integrated Composite Application Network (ICAN) enterprise application integration (EAI) suite Sun bought for $387m from SeeBeyond and promptly open sourced in the belief it could make a profit at the expense of proprietary EAI giants like IBM.

Meanwhile, Sun's Project Kenai code-hosting site- home to nearly 40,000 registered users - is being killed as a public offering. Launched in September 2008, Kenai was billed as different from SourceForge because it also offered social networking features to members.

Farrell said that Kenai wasn't quite working and that Oracle is bringing it in house, where it would use it, "flush it out," and add some features. Farrell said Oracle may re-release Kenai for public use if it finds some value in the project.

Kenai was one of the projects Sun's management urged employees to continue building in order to to stay motivated and chipper while Oracle's purchase was held up by European regulators.

Sun's Project Hudson is a lucky survivor of the acquisition: Hudson will be added to JDeveloper, to provide enhanced application lifecycle management capabilities.

Sun's open source was always of only selected interest to Oracle, which has a track record of evaluating products and keeping only those it considers better than its own.

As a Java middleware vendor, though, Java was one of the key assets in Oracle's $5.6bn Sun acquisition. Judging by the plan outlined by Oracle's executive vice president of product development Thomas Kurian on Wednesday, Oracle's extending Sun's existing work on Java by adding more manpower and money. Part of the reason for this is Oracle has inherited the chief-steward status of Java SE, Enterprise Edition, and Mobile Edition from Sun.

Kurian committed to continue existing efforts on Java SE around modularity, while also focussing on real-time monitoring and optimized garbage collection. Java EE, based on Java SE, will also see that existing work on modularity plus efforts to run dynamic languages in the VM.

Bridging the IT gap between rising business demands and ageing tools

More from The Register

next story
NO MORE ALL CAPS and other pleasures of Visual Studio 14
Unpicking a packed preview that breaks down ASP.NET
Cheer up, Nokia fans. It can start making mobes again in 18 months
The real winner of the Nokia sale is *drumroll* ... Nokia
Put down that Oracle database patch: It could cost $23,000 per CPU
On-by-default INMEMORY tech a boon for developers ... as long as they can afford it
Google shows off new Chrome OS look
Athena springs full-grown from Chromium project's head
Apple: We'll unleash OS X Yosemite beta on the MASSES on 24 July
Starting today, regular fanbois will be guinea pigs, it tells Reg
HIDDEN packet sniffer spy tech in MILLIONS of iPhones, iPads – expert
Don't panic though – Apple's backdoor is not wide open to all, guru tells us
DARPA-derived secure microkernel goes open source tomorrow
Hacker-repelling, drone-protecting code will soon be yours to tweak as you see fit
prev story

Whitepapers

Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications
Learn about the various considerations for defending mobile applications - from the application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Top 8 considerations to enable and simplify mobility
In this whitepaper learn how to successfully add mobile capabilities simply and cost effectively.
Seven Steps to Software Security
Seven practical steps you can begin to take today to secure your applications and prevent the damages a successful cyber-attack can cause.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.