Feeds

Ex-Broadcom boss beats drugs orgy charges

White lines blow away

Eight steps to building an HP BladeSystem

Henry T Nicholas III, the billionaire co-founder of Broadcom, has been cleared of drugs charges by a federal judge.

The US government alleged that as CEO, Nicholas' life was a non-stop party of cocaine, ecstasy, meth, valium, marijuana and prostitutes, which he distributed among friends and business partners.

A Californian judge yesterday threw out the charges, after a related securities fraud case against Nicholas unravelled two weeks ago amid claims the prosecution had improperly influenced witnesses and leaked details to the press.

District judge Cormac Carney however noted Nicholas' former bacchanalian lifestyle, saying: "From the evidence... as well as what's been attained from the pretrial services, it does seem that you had a serious drug problem.

"You paid dearly for that. You lost your marriage, you lost your job, your reputation has been tarnished, but from what I gather you've been clean and sober for two years and I commend you for that."

The colourful indictment against Nicholas, issued in October 2007, alleged he kept a warehouse for storing his various drug stockpiles. It said he spiked Broadcom customers' drinks with MDMA.

It also records an alleged incident in 2001 when the pilot of his private jet was forced to don an oxygen mask as the cabin filled with marijuana smoke.

The US government further claimed he paid off Broadcom staff to keep his debauchery quiet. The whole indictment is here (pdf).

Outside court yesterday, Nicholas briefly thanked supporters, AP reports. He has not ruled out a return to Broadcom and has said he wants to do charity work.

Prosecutors plan to appeal against the dismissal of their securities fraud case, which surrounds alleged backdating of stock options by Nicholas and other Broadcom top brass. ®

Mobile application security vulnerability report

More from The Register

next story
BBC goes offline in MASSIVE COCKUP: Stephen Fry partly muzzled
Auntie tight-lipped as major outage rolls on
iPad? More like iFAD: We reveal why Apple fell into IBM's arms
But never fear fanbois, you're still lapping up iPhones, Macs
White? Male? You work in tech? Let us guess ... Twitter? We KNEW it!
Grim diversity numbers dumped alongside Facebook earnings
HP, Microsoft prove it again: Big Business doesn't create jobs
SMEs get lip service - what they need is dinner at the Club
Bose says today is F*** With Dre Day: Beats sued in patent battle
Music gear giant seeks some of that sweet, sweet Apple pie
Amazon Reveals One Weird Trick: A Loss On Almost $20bn In Sales
Investors really hate it: Share price plunge as growth SLOWS in key AWS division
Dude, you're getting a Dell – with BITCOIN: IT giant slurps cryptocash
1. Buy PC with Bitcoin. 2. Mine more coins. 3. Goto step 1
There's NOTHING on TV in Europe – American video DOMINATES
Even France's mega subsidies don't stop US content onslaught
You! Pirate! Stop pirating, or we shall admonish you politely. Repeatedly, if necessary
And we shall go about telling people you smell. No, not really
prev story

Whitepapers

Top three mobile application threats
Prevent sensitive data leakage over insecure channels or stolen mobile devices.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications
Learn about the various considerations for defending mobile applications - from the application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies.
Build a business case: developing custom apps
Learn how to maximize the value of custom applications by accelerating and simplifying their development.