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StopBadware morphs into standalone non-profit

Anti-Malware Inc backed by Google and Mozilla

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StopBadware, the anti-malware project started four years ago at Harvard University’s Berkman Center for Internet and Society, has spread its wings and become a standalone nonprofit corporation.

Google, PayPal and Mozilla provided initial (unspecified) funding to get StopBadware Inc up and running.

Maxim Weinstein, StopBadware Inc’s executive director, said the project had evolved from acting as a clearing house for research on risks such as spyware to becoming a "mission-driven organisation" with a wider user education and lobbying remit, hence the decision to spin it away from Harvard.

Executive director Weinstein will be joined on the StopBadWare Inc's board of directors by net luminaries including Vint Cerf and Esther Dyson.

StopBadware maintains a database of spyware-tainted sites that it exchanges and supplements with data from Google. Anti-spyware firm Sunbelt Software contributes to drawing up this list, which will continue now that StopBadware has become all grown up. ®

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