Feeds

Motorola seeks ban on US BlackBerries

We have patents on your fruit

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

Motorola is hoping to convince US trade regulators to ban the sale and import of certain BlackBerry phones, which it claims infringe on several patents.

The handset maker said Friday it has filed a complaint with the US International Trade Commission (ITC), asking for an investigation into RIM's alleged unlicensed use of five "early-stage innovations" for mobiles related to Wi-Fi access, user interface, power management, data protection, and storing messages.

Motorola told El Reg in an email that RIM had originally entered into a license agreement for the technology back in 2003, but has continued their use well after the deal expired in 2007.

RIM said it typically declines to comment on litigation.

The filing comes after patent lawsuits laid down by Motorola against RIM in the northern district of Texas and the UK in early 2008. These are unresolved.

Motorola said it doesn't have a "non-confidential version" of the complaint to share with us, but elaborated that the dispute concerns US patents 5,569,550 (a battery pack with under-voltage and over-voltage protection); 5,319,712 (method for providing cryptographic protection of data in a communication system); 5,359,317 (a method for storing a received messages on a phone); 6,232,970 (a user interface design for small handheld devices); and 6,272,333 (a way to control how Wi-Fi data is delivered to a device).

"In light of RIM's continued unlicensed use of Motorola's patents RIM's use of delay tactics in our current patent litigation, and RIM's refusal to design out Motorola's proprietary technology, Motorola has no choice but to file a complaint with the ITC to halt RIM's continued infringement," Jonathan Meyer, Motorola's vice president of intellectual property law, said in a statement.

The filing asks the ITC to issue a ban on RIM from importing or selling any of the allegedly infringing products within the US, as well as halting marketing and advertising for those products.

In 2008, RIM countered Motorola's lawsuit with its own in Texas court, claiming Motorola infringed on several RIM patents. It also accused its rival of anti-competitive conduct for demanding "exorbitant" licensing fees on technologies that are essential to various standards in mobile telecommunications.

The complaint also follows a lawsuit from Eastman Kodak against RIM earlier this month, claiming the company didn't license patents for previewing images in different resolutions. ®

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

More from The Register

next story
4K-ing excellent TV is on its way ... in its own sweet time, natch
For decades Hollywood actually binned its 4K files. Doh!
Oi, Tim Cook. Apple Watch. I DARE you to tell me, IN PERSON, that it's secure
State attorney demands Apple CEO bows the knee to him
Apple's big bang: iPhone 6, ANOTHER iPhone 6 Plus and WATCH OUT
Let's >sigh< see what Cupertino has been up to for the past year
Huawei ditches new Windows Phone mobe plans, blames poor sales
Giganto mobe firm slams door shut on Microsoft. OH DEAR
Phones 4u website DIES as wounded mobe retailer struggles to stay above water
Founder blames 'ruthless network partners' for implosion
Get your Indian Landfill Android One handsets - they're only SIXTY QUID
Cheap and deafening mobes for the subcontinental masses
Apple's SNEAKY plan: COPY ANDROID. Hello iPhone 6, Watch
Sizes, prices and all – but not for the wrist-o-puter
A SCORCHIO fatboy SSD: Samsung SSD850 PRO 3D V-NAND
4Gb/s speeds on a consumer drive, anyone?
prev story

Whitepapers

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Security and trust: The backbone of doing business over the internet
Explores the current state of website security and the contributions Symantec is making to help organizations protect critical data and build trust with customers.