Feeds

Linux coders do it for money

No such thing as a free (software) launch

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

Around 75 per cent of Linux developers raked in cash from their code crunching in the past year.

It's a figure that in many ways comes as little surprise, given that Linux usage has become so widespread across industries, government and the public sector in recent years.

Linux kernel contributor Jonathan Corbet told an audience at the Linux.conf.au 2010 conference in Wellington, New Zealand, earlier this week that code monkeys had a very busy 2009, working on projects for distributions such as Red Hat, Ubuntu, Debian and co.

The end result was something of a boon for Linux developers.

"75 per cent of the code comes from people paid to do it," said Corbet, according to APCmag.com.

He pointed out that between 24 December 2008 and 10 January 2010, developers wrote 2.8 million lines of code, with 55,000 tweaks being contributed to the Linux kernel.

According to Corbet's figures, 18 per cent of Linux kernel contributions came via a community effort not derived from a corporate source. A further seven per cent of code donations were unclassified, and the remaining 75 per cent came from people working on behalf of companies to develop code.

Red Hat, which had an extremely busy 2009, came out on top with 12 per cent of contributions. Intel coughed up eight per cent of code, IBM and Novell offered six per cent each, and Oracle trailed with three per cent.

The likes of Google and Apple were notably absent from Corbet's list as, while both companies use Linux-based systems to build their tech, neither have a tendency to contribute code back to the kernel.

"Hardware support is nearly universal - we support more hardware than just about any other system Graphics by the end of this year is really not going to be a big problem," he added.

The next version (2.6.33) of the Linux kernel is expected to be pumped out in early March. ®

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk

More from The Register

next story
Preview redux: Microsoft ships new Windows 10 build with 7,000 changes
Latest bleeding-edge bits borrow Action Center from Windows Phone
Google opens Inbox – email for people too thick to handle email
Print this article out and give it to someone tech-y if you get stuck
Microsoft promises Windows 10 will mean two-factor auth for all
Sneak peek at security features Redmond's baking into new OS
UNIX greybeards threaten Debian fork over systemd plan
'Veteran Unix Admins' fear desktop emphasis is betraying open source
Google+ goes TITSUP. But WHO knew? How long? Anyone ... Hello ...
Wobbly Gmail, Contacts, Calendar on the other hand ...
DEATH by PowerPoint: Microsoft warns of 0-day attack hidden in slides
Might put out patch in update, might chuck it out sooner
Redmond top man Satya Nadella: 'Microsoft LOVES Linux'
Open-source 'love' fairly runneth over at cloud event
prev story

Whitepapers

Cloud and hybrid-cloud data protection for VMware
Learn how quick and easy it is to configure backups and perform restores for VMware environments.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Three 1TB solid state scorchers up for grabs
Big SSDs can be expensive but think big and think free because you could be the lucky winner of one of three 1TB Samsung SSD 840 EVO drives that we’re giving away worth over £300 apiece.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.