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Zero-power LCD aims to reduce paper use

Chalkboard for the 21st Century?

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Pen and paper remains the simplest and often quickest way of scribbling down messages. Now US-based screen manufacturer Kent Displays has launched a power-free LCD writing tablet designed to reduce the world’s paper use.

boogie_board_01

Kent Displays' Boogie Board: create electronic images without power

The Boogie Board LCD Writing Tablet’s screen is made using Kent’s own no-power LCD technology.

The panel is flexible and has a reflective layer so there's no need for a backlight. Like E Ink screens, this one is non-volatile, so it doesn't require power to keep the pixels showing what they're showing.

Pixels change colour as you write on the screen. The more pressure you apply, the thicker the line.

A “small amount of power” is needed to wipe the slate clean when you're done. This comes from a watch battery good for 50,000 uses, Kent said.

Boogie Board is available now through Amazon US for $30 (£18).

The gadget is expected to launch in the UK later this year. ®

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