Feeds

Manchester ID staff suffer isolation as new dawn fades

Just 1300 Mancunians apply for cards

The essential guide to IT transformation

The people of Manchester have either lost all interest in travelling abroad and drinking, or couldn't give a monkey's about the government's lame duck ID card scheme, if a commons answer is anything to go by.

Manchester is the first big trialling ground for the ID card scheme, before a broader trial across the rest of the North West. The government has been spending almost half a million quid trying to publicise the scheme in the city, touting its uses when travelling to Europe and clubbing.

And the results so far?

Meg Hillier, the Home Office minister stuck with responsibility for the scheme, revealed in a Commons answer this week that a whacking 1,300 people in Greater Manchester "have applied and attended an enrolment appointment for an identity card" between November 30 and January 14, 2010. Allowing for three Bank Holidays and weekends, that works out to around 43 people a day.

Hillier revealed that over the same period, 439,000 passport applications were received by the Identity and Passport Service. However, she said that passport info was not "readily held in a format to enable a further breakdown of those resident in Manchester". She added that while ID card applicants could also apply for a passport, the two processes were currently separate. Fingerprint biometric passports are due to kick in from 2012, at which point anyone seeking a passport can also get an ID card.

However, a quick back of the envelope calculation using those figures suggests that while 0.7 per cent of the UK population as a whole was applying for a passport, a mere 0.05 per cent of the 2.5m Greater Mancunians were rushing to get an ID card. If you use the population of the city proper, the rate is 0.26 per cent.

Back in October, the government said 2,000 people in the North West expressed an interest in applying for the card. That suggests a conversion rate that would make a direct mail firm proud. though how many more people have joined the queue remains to be seen.

Perhaps those eager early birds are simply hoping to have a truly unique collectable if the Tories scrap the benighted scheme if/when they get into power. ®

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup

More from The Register

next story
Munich considers dumping Linux for ... GULP ... Windows!
Give a penguinista a hug, the Outlook's not good for open source's poster child
UK fuzz want PINCODES on ALL mobile phones
Met Police calls for mandatory passwords on all new mobes
e-Borders fiasco: Brits stung for £224m after US IT giant sues UK govt
Defeat to Raytheon branded 'catastrophic result'
EU justice chief blasts Google on 'right to be forgotten'
Don't pretend it's a freedom of speech issue – interim commish
Detroit losing MILLIONS because it buys CHEAP BATTERIES – report
Man at hardware store was right: name brands DO last longer
Snowden on NSA's MonsterMind TERROR: It may trigger cyberwar
Plus: Syria's internet going down? That was a US cock-up
UK government accused of hiding TRUTH about Universal Credit fiasco
'Reset rating keeps secrets on one-dole-to-rule-them-all plan', say MPs
Caught red-handed: UK cops, PCSOs, specials behaving badly… on social media
No Mr Fuzz, don't ask a crime victim to be your pal on Facebook
Yes, but what are your plans if a DRAGON attacks?
Local UK gov outs most ridiculous FoI requests...
prev story

Whitepapers

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup
IT departments are embracing cloud backup, but there’s a lot you need to know before choosing a service provider. Learn all the critical things you need to know.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Build a business case: developing custom apps
Learn how to maximize the value of custom applications by accelerating and simplifying their development.
Rethinking backup and recovery in the modern data center
Combining intelligence, operational analytics, and automation to enable efficient, data-driven IT organizations using the HP ABR approach.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.