Feeds

Google explains China Syndrome by advertising - on Google

As China ring-fences internet spat

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

Google is serving up an explanation of its China syndrome difficulties amongst its sponsored search results - but has apparently balked at the idea of pouring its marketing budget into Bing or Yahoo!'s pockets.

Searchengineland spotted that users tapping 'Google China' into Google will see the usual slew of results, as well as a sponsored link to the blog posting that kicked off the whole Google/China/hacking/dissidents firestorm last week.

This is fair enough - Google has to make its point somewhere, after all. It might help if its PR department actually returned journalists' calls, though.

However, the firm appears to have limits on exactly who it wants to get its message out to, and users of lesser search engines are not on its radar.

The same search terms on Bing show no sponsored results on the main search page, though the shopping results do serve up some sponsored results. These included florists and valentines in China, though we suspect Google won't be availing itself of such services for a while.

The cupboard is equally bare over at Yahoo!, though a search on China does offer some sponsored links to holidays there. Something else we don't imagine Google top brass doing anytime soon.

Alternatively, it may be that Yahoo! and Microsoft have turned down the Google shilling to tell it to do its own shilling.

Meanwhile, China has played down the impact of its falling out with Google on the broader relationship with Washington. State news agency Xinhua, quoted Vice Foreign Minister He Yafei as saying: "The Google incident should not be linked to bilateral relations, otherwise that would be over-interpreting it."

He added that relations between China and the US had been "basically stable" since Barack Obama took the presidency. He also repeated Beijing's position that it welcomed foreign internet companies, as long as they observed Beijing's laws, and/or Beijing's interpretations of same.

The comments - which could be construed as either emollient or threatening, depending on your point of view - came ahead of a planned speech by Secretary of State Hillary Clinton on internet freedom. ®

The essential guide to IT transformation

More from The Register

next story
Assange™: Hey world, I'M STILL HERE, ignore that Snowden guy
Press conference: ME ME ME ME ME ME ME (cont'd pg 94)
Premier League wants to PURGE ALL FOOTIE GIFs from social media
Not paying Murdoch? You're gonna get a right LEGALLING - thanks to automated software
Caught red-handed: UK cops, PCSOs, specials behaving badly… on social media
No Mr Fuzz, don't ask a crime victim to be your pal on Facebook
Ballmer quits Microsoft board to spend more time with his b-balls
From Clippy to Clippers: Hi, I see you're running an NBA team now ...
Online tat bazaar eBay coughs to YET ANOTHER outage
Web-based flea market struck dumb by size and scale of fail
Kate Bush: Don't make me HAVE CONTACT with your iPHONE
Can't face sea of wobbling fondle implements. What happened to lighters, eh?
Amazon takes swipe at PayPal, Square with card reader for mobes
Etailer plans to undercut rivals with low transaction fee offer
Call of Duty daddy considers launching own movie studio
Activision Blizzard might like quality control of a CoD film
prev story

Whitepapers

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup
IT departments are embracing cloud backup, but there’s a lot you need to know before choosing a service provider. Learn all the critical things you need to know.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Build a business case: developing custom apps
Learn how to maximize the value of custom applications by accelerating and simplifying their development.
Rethinking backup and recovery in the modern data center
Combining intelligence, operational analytics, and automation to enable efficient, data-driven IT organizations using the HP ABR approach.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.