Feeds

Survey shows strong demand for Apple tablet

Punters putting off laptop purchases as a result?

Business security measures using SSL

Market research from US stats gatherer ChangeWave suggests Apple fans may be delaying laptop purchases just in case the much-rumoured iPad tablet shows up.

Earlier this month, ChangeWave asked 3314 consumers about their recent and anticipated buying habits.

Together, 18 per cent of respondents said they were very or somewhat likely to buy the Apple tablet, so there's clearly interest there. Three-quarters of them said they'd pay $500 or more for an iPad, though only 37 per cent were willing to pay more than $700. Some pundits have said they expect Apple to charge $999 for it.

ChangeWave said the degree of interest in the putative tablet matches exactly the demand it measured back in 2005 when Apple announced it would transition the Mac family from PowerPC to Intel processors.

The two cases - the evolution of an established platform that punters know, and the creation of an almost entirely new one that they don't - may not be directly comparable, but ChangeWave's point is that the level of interest shown in Intel Macs was born out in subsequent sales. Surely, then, the same degree of interest in the tablet bodes well for the new platform too.

In August 2005, 37 per cent of potential Mac buyers said they would briefly delay their purchases to wait for the then new Intel-based machines.

In January 2010, Apple's share of ChangeWave survey respondents who bought a laptop in the past 90 days dropped to 17 per cent from 24 per cent in October 2009 and 25 per cent in September 2009.

Dell's share, by contrast, was 18 per cent, up from 17 per cent in October, though that was down on September's 24 per cent. HP has been on the rise since September, with shares of 21 per cent for that month, 25 per cent for October and 29 per cent for January 2010.

ChangeWave puts the PC companies' more recent increases down to the debut of Windows 7, a key factor in Apple's recent decline. But neither firm's gain was the same size as Apple's drop, suggesting other factors may be at play. There has been so much Apple tablet speculation over the past few months that it's hard to conclude this hasn't had an impact too. Particularly since Apple's desktop share, despite Windows 7, has increased, to 20 per cent from 17 per cent. ®

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
Man buys iPHONE 6 and DROPS IT to SMASH on PURPOSE
Yarrrgh! 'Tis Antipodean insanity, ye crazy swab
Oi, Tim Cook. Apple Watch. I DARE you to tell me, IN PERSON, that it's secure
State attorney demands Apple CEO bows the knee to him
4K-ing excellent TV is on its way ... in its own sweet time, natch
For decades Hollywood actually binned its 4K files. Doh!
Phones 4u website DIES as wounded mobe retailer struggles to stay above water
Founder blames 'ruthless network partners' for implosion
Monitors monitor's monitoring finds touch screens have 0.4% market share
Not four. Point four. Count yer booty again, Microsoft
Your chance to WIN the WORLD'S ONLY HANDHELD ZX SPECTRUM
Reg staff not allowed to enter, god dammit
DARPA-backed jetpack prototype built to make soldiers run faster
4 Minute Mile project hatched to speed up tired troops
prev story

Whitepapers

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Saudi Petroleum chooses Tegile storage solution
A storage solution that addresses company growth and performance for business-critical applications of caseware archive and search along with other key operational systems.
Protecting users from Firesheep and other Sidejacking attacks with SSL
Discussing the vulnerabilities inherent in Wi-Fi networks, and how using TLS/SSL for your entire site will assure security.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.