Feeds

Rambus thanks Samsung for the memory

$900 million? That'll do nicely...

SANS - Survey on application security programs

It was a good day at the office yesterday for Rambus; it made $900m when Samsung caved in on the eve of a court case, which the Korean firm had planned to fight alongside Hynix and Micron.

Rambus, which develops and licenses memory technology, has been in dispute for many years with a variety of leading semi-conductor firms alleging they used its technology improperly. Several claimed that Rambus had co-operated in bad faith with them in standards bodies and the US Federal Trade Commission was pursuing Rambus for anti-competitive trade practices. Rambus's lawyers put paid to that after an appeal to the US Supreme Court.

Samsung has now agreed to license Rambus’s patent portfolio, covering all its semiconductor products. This includes a perpetual, fully paid-up license to some current DRAM products. Furthermore, Samsung will invest $200m in Rambus stock as part of the settlement. It will also make an initial payment of $200m and a quarterly payment of about $25m for the next five years, meaning Samsung has to find $900m in total.

As well as that, the two have signed a memorandum of understanding (MOU) relating to Samsung use of a new Rambus high-performance memory interface. The two companies will initially focus this on graphics and mobile memory, before moving on to look at potential collaboration on server and high-speed NAND flash memories.

All claims and counterclaims between Samsung and Rambus are settled by this agreement. Unless Hynix and Micron have something that Samsung hasn't in their legal cases, it looks like these two will roll over as well, netting Rambus more cash.

The stock purchase by Samsung and the use of newer Rambus technologies that post-date Rambus's long-lasting legal blitzkrieg against the semi-conductor industry is encouraging. It suggests that the industry and Rambus may now see themselves as partners rather than antagonists going forward.

That will please everyone. Except, possibly, the legal eagles. ®

Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction

More from The Register

next story
Reg man builds smart home rig, gains SUPREME CONTROL of DOMAIN – Pics
LightwaveRF and Arduino: Bright ideas for dim DIYers
Leaked pics show EMBIGGENED iPhone 6 screen
Fat-fingered fanbois rejoice over Chinternet snaps
Apple patent LOCKS drivers out of their OWN PHONES
I'm sorry Dave, I'm afraid I can't let you text that
Microsoft signs Motorola to Android patent pact – no, not THAT Motorola
The part that Google never got will play ball with Redmond
Slip your finger in this ring and unlock your backdoor, phone, etc
Take a look at this new NFC jewellery – why, what were you thinking of?
Happy 25th birthday, Game Boy!
Monochrome handset ushered in modern mobile gaming era
Rounded corners? Pah! Amazon's '3D phone has eye-tracking tech'
Now THAT'S what we call a proper new feature
US mobile firms cave on kill switch, agree to install anti-theft code
Slow and kludgy rollout will protect corporate profits
prev story

Whitepapers

Securing web applications made simple and scalable
In this whitepaper learn how automated security testing can provide a simple and scalable way to protect your web applications.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Mainstay ROI - Does application security pay?
In this whitepaper learn how you and your enterprise might benefit from better software security.
Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction
Based on their experience using HP ArcSight Enterprise Security Manager for IT security operations, Finansbank moved to HP ArcSight ESM for fraud management.