Feeds

IBM's 'Project Vulcan' sneak peeks Lotus Notes future

Live Labs experiment

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

IBM is giving its researchers a new pipeline to show off early versions of net-based Lotus collaboration tools.

As part of its annual Lotusphere conference on Monday, the company also provided a peek at what it sees as the future of the business collaboration suite, a thing called "Project Vulcan."

Taking a page from Google Labs, Big Blue's new LotusLive Labs website is designed to spur public feedback (and hype) on LotusLive cloud collaboration technologies while they're still cooking in pre-production. The project is a joint effort from IBM's Research unit and its Lotus software team.

Scheduled to make a beta appearance on the LotusLive Labs in the second half of 2010, Project Vulcan looks to be the most ambitious of the Lotus previews debuting on the website this year.

According to Ed Brill, IBM chief of product management for Lotus software, Project Vulcan represents the future direction for Lotus Notes. It's described as combining email, profiles, calendars, and social analytics in one spot, and it will use analytics engines and business-specific scenarios to make collaboration more relevant and focused. It also promises to include developer-friendly services and APIs.

Shades of Google Wave, with a bit of IBM's analytics oomph behind it. But user interface-wise, it's all Facebook - judging by the "conceptual representation" graphic Mills supplied:

Project Vulcan sneak-peek.

"One of the key evolutionary thoughts in IBM Project Vulcan is to move from what we currently refer to as 'linked value' across the IBM portfolio to the notion of 'loosely-coupled' services," Brill wrote in his blog. "This makes sense in an increasingly-expected hybrid environment, and will simplify deployment and adoption of collaboration and productivity within your organization.  Web services, xPages, HTML5, RESTful APIs, will all be tools in pushing Project Vulcan forward."

Other LotusLive previews in the pipeline include Slide Library, a collaborative way to share presentation resources; Event Maps, an interactive way to organize and browse conference schedules; Collaborative Recorded Meetings, a service that records and transcribes meeting presentations; and Composer, which lets users create new applications by mashing up existing services from the web, email, and collaboration tools.

The four can be previewed now by signing up for IBM's LotusLive Labs website. ®

Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile

More from The Register

next story
Download alert: Nearly ALL top 100 Android, iOS paid apps hacked
Attack of the Clones? Yeah, but much, much scarier – report
You stupid BRICK! PCs running Avast AV can't handle Windows fixes
Fix issued, fingers pointed, forums in flames
Microsoft: Your Linux Docker containers are now OURS to command
New tool lets admins wrangle Linux apps from Windows
Facebook, working on Facebook at Work, works on Facebook. At Work
You don't want your cat or drunk pics at the office
Soz, web devs: Google snatches its Wallet off the table
Killing off web service in 3 months... but app-happy bonkers are fine
First in line to order a Nexus 6? AT&T has a BRICK for you
Black Screen of Death plagues early Google-mobe batch
prev story

Whitepapers

Why cloud backup?
Combining the latest advancements in disk-based backup with secure, integrated, cloud technologies offer organizations fast and assured recovery of their critical enterprise data.
Getting started with customer-focused identity management
Learn why identity is a fundamental requirement to digital growth, and how without it there is no way to identify and engage customers in a meaningful way.
Driving business with continuous operational intelligence
Introducing an innovative approach offered by ExtraHop for producing continuous operational intelligence.
5 critical considerations for enterprise cloud backup
Key considerations when evaluating cloud backup solutions to ensure adequate protection security and availability of enterprise data.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?