Feeds

Microsoft plucks Azure SLAs from cloud of secrecy

Bad choice of words?

Next gen security for virtualised datacentres

Microsoft will revise the wording on its Azure cloud service level agreements (SLAs) following a trip into a Kafkaesque world of secrecy.

The company promised The Reg that it will update the wording on the site for its Windows Azure Compute, Azure Storage Service, SQL Azure, and AppFabric Service Bus and Access Control services, after a change that meant you had to agree not to tell another soul about the contents of the SLAs before you could even download or read the SLAs.

Roger Jennings of the OakLeaf System blog flagged up the change here.

According to Microsoft's iron-clad and circular terms and conditions:

"The service level agreements (SLAs) posed on this site are the confidential information of Microsoft. You may view the SLAs if you have purchased or are considering the purchase of Online Services from Microsoft. You agree not to disclose the SLAS to any other third party or to make use of the information for purposes not related to the your [sic] purchase or prospective purchase of Online Services from Microsoft. By downloading or viewing this document, you agree to these terms."

The wording led Jennings naturally to speculated about why exactly Microsoft was pulling its SLAs back behind the iron curtain, when other cloud providers like Amazon (here and here) are open and upfront about their SLAs. Indeed, it's considered a positive plus to publish your SLAs so potential customers can make an informed choice and potentially use your service.

"Designating the guarantee of availability of a service offered to the public as 'confidential information' appears to be to be momentous over-reaching," Jennings wrote.

A Microsoft spokesperson told The Reg the Azure SLAs are not bound by an NDA, only individual customer SLAs that differ from the general SLAs. She said Microsoft world clarify the language on the WindowsAzure.com website Friday and thanked Jennings for pointing out the issue.

The spokesperson was unable to explain how, or why, the wording appeared.

For the record, Microsoft's public NDAs are 99.9 per cent uptime each for instance monitoring and restart, storage availability, database availability, and service bus and access control availability, and 99.95 per cent availability of compute connectivity.

Failure to hit with the SLA uptime per centages will result in a 10 per cent or 25 per cent discount on the monthly billing for the particular service, depending on the degree of the failure. ®

Build a business case: developing custom apps

More from The Register

next story
Why has the web gone to hell? Market chaos and HUMAN NATURE
Tim Berners-Lee isn't happy, but we should be
Mozilla's 'Tiles' ads debut in new Firefox nightlies
You can try turning them off and on again
Microsoft boots 1,500 dodgy apps from the Windows Store
DEVELOPERS! DEVELOPERS! DEVELOPERS! Naughty, misleading developers!
'Stop dissing Google or quit': OK, I quit, says Code Club co-founder
And now a message from our sponsors: 'STFU or else'
Apple promises to lift Curse of the Drained iPhone 5 Battery
Have you tried turning it off and...? Never mind, here's a replacement
Uber, Lyft and cutting corners: The true face of the Sharing Economy
Casual labour and tired ideas = not really web-tastic
Linux turns 23 and Linus Torvalds celebrates as only he can
No, not with swearing, but by controlling the release cycle
prev story

Whitepapers

Gartner critical capabilities for enterprise endpoint backup
Learn why inSync received the highest overall rating from Druva and is the top choice for the mobile workforce.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Rethinking backup and recovery in the modern data center
Combining intelligence, operational analytics, and automation to enable efficient, data-driven IT organizations using the HP ABR approach.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.