Feeds
60%
Nokia Booklet 3G

Nokia Booklet 3G

Mobile maker's netbook debut

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Business security measures using SSL

Review Given its unparalleled success in the mobile phone market, it was only a matter of time before Nokia tried its hand at creating a laptop. The Finnish manufacturer isn’t keen on its Booklet 3G being called a netbook, though. Instead, ‘mini laptop’ is the preferred term. But with features such as 10.1in screen and Intel Atom processor, it sure looks like a netbook to us.

Nokia Booklet 3G

Nokia’s Booklet 3G: it’s a mini laptop, got it?

A common complaint with netbooks (not least from Reg readers) is that prices have crept up and up ever since Asus started the whole thing off back in 2007 with its £220 Eee PC 701. Given the Booklet 3G’s price tag is nearly three times this figure, we’re fairly confident a large proportion of you will instantly dismiss it. Before we deliver our judgment, though, we’ll take a closer look at exactly what that £649 gets you.

At 264 x 185 x 19.9mm and weighing 1.25kg, it’s on a par with other 10in netbooks in terms of portability. And were it not for the Nokia logo on the glossy lid (it’s available in black, ice and azure flavours), you’d be forgiven for thinking this netbook had crept out of Apple’s labs. Indeed, with its aluminium chassis and minimalistic design, it has a certain mini-MacBook feel to it.

The display is attached to the main body via a pair of well-made hinges, although our review sample did have a slight creak to it when the lid was opened. You won’t find any creaking elsewhere. Make no mistake: this is one sturdily designed netbook that puts the current crop of plastic-clad models to shame.

Flip the Booklet 3G on its belly and the less-is-more approach continues. With no screws in sight, the aluminium base is marred only by four rubber footrests and a pair of catches for the battery. Despite being a 16-cell, 3840mAh monster, the battery doesn’t jut out from the rear. Instead, it fits snugly into the confines of the chassis.

Nokia Booklet 3G

Dimensions are in line with rival 10in netbooks

On the left of the netbook sits an HDMI output along with a pair of USB ports and a headphone socket, while a further USB port is located on the right side. The right is also home to the power connector and a flap that hides both the SD and SIM card slots. A small, recessed power button is here too, which, when feeling for it along the edge, can be difficult to locate and fiddly to operate.

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
Oi, Tim Cook. Apple Watch. I DARE you to tell me, IN PERSON, that it's secure
State attorney demands Apple CEO bows the knee to him
4K-ing excellent TV is on its way ... in its own sweet time, natch
For decades Hollywood actually binned its 4K files. Doh!
Phones 4u website DIES as wounded mobe retailer struggles to stay above water
Founder blames 'ruthless network partners' for implosion
DARPA-backed jetpack prototype built to make soldiers run faster
4 Minute Mile project hatched to speed up tired troops
Hey, Mac fanbois. HGST wants you drooling over its HUGE desktop RACK
What vast digital media repository could possibly need 64 TERABYTES?
Apple Pay is a tidy payday for Apple with 0.15% cut, sources say
Cupertino slurps 15 cents from every $100 purchase
Apple's ONE LESS THING: the iPod Classic disappears
RIP 2001 – 2014. MP3 player beloved of millions. Killed by cloud
prev story

Whitepapers

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Saudi Petroleum chooses Tegile storage solution
A storage solution that addresses company growth and performance for business-critical applications of caseware archive and search along with other key operational systems.
Protecting users from Firesheep and other Sidejacking attacks with SSL
Discussing the vulnerabilities inherent in Wi-Fi networks, and how using TLS/SSL for your entire site will assure security.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.