Feeds

Johnson reveals ID register linked to NI numbers

It's a one-stop data shop

Next gen security for virtualised datacentres

Home Secretary Alan Johnson has confirmed that the National Identity Register contains National Insurance numbers and answers to 'shared secrets'.

In a revelation that is likely to intensify the arguments over the privacy implications of the database, Johnson claimed the NI numbers have been included to "aid identity verification checks for identity cards and, in time, passports".

They could also be used to cross-reference the register with other government databases, including tax and benefits.

The answers to shared secrets chosen by applicants will be used to allow them to identity themselves over the phone. Johnson said this method, commonly used by banks, would speed up the reporting of lost or stolen documents or a change of address.

He was responding to a written parliamentary question from shadow home secretary Chris Grayling, asking what information will be held on the National Identity Register which is not held on the UK Passport Database.

Johnson said the information held on both is similar, but that in addition to NI numbers and shared secrets, the register holds fingerprint biometrics, which will be required for passport issue in future, and a unique national identity registration number.

He added that between 20 October and 10 December last year more than 2,400 people had voluntarily enrolled, or made an appointment to enrol, for an identity card.

The Home Office has now begun to require skilled foreign workers to register for ID cards when renewing their visas – three months earlier than it had originally planned. It has estimated that this will lead to an extra 40,000 foreign nationals being issued with the cards each year.

This article was originally published at Kable.

Kable's GC weekly is a free email newsletter covering the latest news and analysis of public sector technology. To register click here.

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
Super Cali signs a kill-switch, campaigners say it's atrocious
Remote-death button bad news for crooks, protesters – and great news for hackers?
UK government accused of hiding TRUTH about Universal Credit fiasco
'Reset rating keeps secrets on one-dole-to-rule-them-all plan', say MPs
Ex US cybersecurity czar guilty in child sex abuse website case
Health and Human Services IT security chief headed online to share vile images
Don't even THINK about copyright violation, says Indian state
Pre-emptive arrest for pirates in Karnataka
The police are WRONG: Watching YouTube videos is NOT illegal
And our man Corfield is pretty bloody cross about it
Felony charges? Harsh! Alleged Anon hackers plead guilty to misdemeanours
US judge questions harsh sentence sought by prosecutors
prev story

Whitepapers

A new approach to endpoint data protection
What is the best way to ensure comprehensive visibility, management, and control of information on both company-owned and employee-owned devices?
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Maximize storage efficiency across the enterprise
The HP StoreOnce backup solution offers highly flexible, centrally managed, and highly efficient data protection for any enterprise.
How modern custom applications can spur business growth
Learn how to create, deploy and manage custom applications without consuming or expanding the need for scarce, expensive IT resources.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.