Feeds

Yes, the Googlephone works in Blighty

And far better than it does in the US

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

In the US, Google's unlocked Nexus One handset plays with only one major 3G wireless network: T-Mobile's. But in other parts of the world, your options are rather more extensive.

Sold from Google's new US-based online phone store, the inaugural Googlephone supports four GSM frequencies: 850MHz, 900MHz, 1800MHz, and 1900MHz. So it will work with practically any GSM-based SIM card worldwide.

It also supports a trio of 3G/UMTS bands: 2100MHz, AWS, and 900MHz. This leaves out the 3G networks operated by the likes of AT&T in the US and Rogers in Canada, but otherwise, it can tap the 3G networks operated by most major GSM carriers across the globe.

If you're on AT&T in the US and you can live without 3G, the phone will run on the company's 2.5G Edge network.

In the UK, Orange, O2, Vodafone, 3, and T-Mobile all use the 2100-MHz band. And though Google has yet to open a .co.uk phone store, it is now shipping to the UK from its US store. Google will also ship to Singapore and Hong Kong, and it plans to open online stores in the UK and elsewhere in the near future.

The phone does not play with CDMA-based networks from the likes of Sprint and Verizon in the US. But Google has committed to producing a CDMA model for Verizon's network, saying it's due this spring. This model will not work with GSM networks. ®

Update: This story has been updated to show that 3 also uses the 2100MHz band.

Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile

Whitepapers

Seattle children’s accelerates Citrix login times by 500% with cross-tier insight
Seattle Children’s is a leading research hospital with a large and growing Citrix XenDesktop deployment. See how they used ExtraHop to accelerate launch times.
Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
How to determine if cloud backup is right for your servers
Two key factors, technical feasibility and TCO economics, that backup and IT operations managers should consider when assessing cloud backup.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Business security measures using SSL
Examines the major types of threats to information security that businesses face today and the techniques for mitigating those threats.