Feeds

UK mobile operators call for UK competition regulation

Rivals use watchdogs to annoy T-Orange as much as possible

Gartner critical capabilities for enterprise endpoint backup

UK mobile operators, with the exception of T-Mobile and Orange, have called for the UK authorities to investigate the creation of T-Orange rather than trusting Brussels.

T-Mobile and Orange were hoping an EU-level investigation could wave the merger through smoothly, but everyone else wants to see as much investigation as possible, ideally both in Europe and the UK. This would be in the interests of customer service, of course - the fact that delaying the merger will cost T-Mobile and Orange dearly is besides the point.

The call to involve the UK regulator is hardly surprising: it's being backed by O2, Vodafone and 3, who all want to see every barrier raised customer concerns addressed before the merger, which was signed in November, goes ahead.

The operators are calling for the UK's Competition Commission and the Office of Fair Trading to get involved, though they'd be pleased if any other paperwork-generating body would like to have a shot, too.

The creation of T-Orange will reduce the number of mobile operators from five to four, and with 3 already merging its network operations with T-Mobile, that means four operators running over three separate networks in the UK: which one might imagine would still provide significant competition.

More concerning is the accumulation of radio spectrum into the hands of one player: T-Orange will have licences for twice the frequencies of the competition and that could be increasingly important for rolling out 4th-generation services.

So once the preliminary threats and accusations are over, we can expect some sort of deal to emerge whereby the new company gives up some spectrum holdings in return for being allowed to exist, but first we have to listen to the operators claiming to represent consumers while actually working out how best to serve their shareholders. ®

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup

More from The Register

next story
Raspberry Pi B+: PHWOAR, get a load of those pins
More USB ports than your laptop? You'd better believe it...
So, Apple won't sell cheap kit? Prepare the iOS garden wall WRECKING BALL
It can throw the low cost race if it looks to the cloud
Apple promises to lift Curse of the Drained iPhone 5 Battery
Have you tried turning it off and...? Never mind, here's a replacement
Now that's FIRE WIRE: HP recalls 6 MILLION burn-risk laptop cables
Right in the middle of Burning Mains Man week
Apple's iWatch? They cannae do it ... they don't have the POWER
Analyst predicts fanbois will have to wait until next year
Super Cali signs a kill-switch, campaigners say it's atrocious
Remote-death button bad news for crooks, protesters – and great news for hackers?
HUGE iPAD? Maybe. HUGE ADVERTS? That's for SURE
Noo! Hand not big enough! Don't look at meee!
prev story

Whitepapers

A new approach to endpoint data protection
What is the best way to ensure comprehensive visibility, management, and control of information on both company-owned and employee-owned devices?
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Maximize storage efficiency across the enterprise
The HP StoreOnce backup solution offers highly flexible, centrally managed, and highly efficient data protection for any enterprise.
How modern custom applications can spur business growth
Learn how to create, deploy and manage custom applications without consuming or expanding the need for scarce, expensive IT resources.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.