Feeds

BMC gulps down Java management minnow

Expect more

Intelligent flash storage arrays

Management specialist BMC Software has shelled out to buy Phurnace Software, a privately held and venture backed maker of tools to manage the release-cycles of commercial Java applications.

Phurnace Software was established in 2007 and its Deliver line of application release management tools for Java applications got their start in a business incubator at the University of Texas campus. In April 2007, the company hired Larry Warnock, who had executive positions at Vignette, Onlink Technologies (now part of Oracle), and Documentum (now part of EMC), to be its chief executive officer.

Five months later, Phurnace received its initial funding from DFJ Mercury, the Houston early stage venture fund affiliated with Draper Fisher Jurvetson Ventures. A month, later Jay Gardner, chief information officer at BMC and formerly a sales executive at IBM, joined the Phurnace board of directors after retiring from BMC.

That November, the first production release of the Deliver tools, release 3.1, came to market, with the goal of standardizing how Java applications are deployed across multiple types of Java application servers.

The idea is to stop system administrators and programmers from creating snarls of custom scripts to deploy Java applications on different web application servers and to use the Deliver tool to mask the differences between app servers and do it consistently.

The original Deliver 3.1 release had support for BEA Systems' WebLogic - now Oracle's WebLogic - and IBM's WebSphere application servers. Support for the JBoss application server came with Deliver release 3.3 in March 2008, as did integration with Subversion and CVS code repositories.

In July 2008, after patching the Deliver tool to integrate with IBM's WebSphere Portal, Rational Build Forge, and ClearCase tools, Phurnace closed $5m in Series A financing, with S3 Ventures leading the way and DFJ Mercury kicking in some more dough.

Despite the economic meltdown and without giving any specific figures, Phurnace said in early 2009 that the final quarter of 2008 was the best in its history and the company started building up its technical and sales teams.

The groundwork for the BMC acquisition was laid in May 2009, when Phurnace announced that its Deliver tools could now integrate with BMC's BladeLogic and Hewlett-Packard's Server Automation - formerly Opsware - application deployment tools with Deliver 3.6.

BMC has been acquisitive before and after the meltdown, realizing that it has to keep adding to its software stack to grow sales and profits. In October, BMC bought British software company and BMC-partner Tideway Systems for its Foundation line of infrastructure discovery tools, and the August acquisition of MQSoftware, which makes monitoring tools for keeping track of what various message queuing middleware programs are up to.

BMC did not disclose how much it paid for these two companies, just as it is not disclosing what it shelled out for Phurnace. But the company had to tell shareholders it ponied up $800m back in March 2008 to buy BladeLogic, which has been tapped as the application management software layer in the California Unified Computing System blade servers from Cisco Systems.

BMC says it will be tucking the Deliver tools from Phurnace into the BladeLogic Server Automation Suite and will give them the name BladeLogic Application Release Automation.

Expect more - and possibly larger - acquisitions from BMC in the future. The company had $1.87bn in sales in the fiscal year ended last September, posted $238.1m in net earnings, and ended its year with $1.1bn in cash. That cash hoard was growing despite the downturn as calendar 2008 was ending. ®

Remote control for virtualized desktops

More from The Register

next story
Bada-Bing! Mozilla flips Firefox to YAHOO! for search
Microsoft system will be the default for browser in US until 2020
Download alert: Nearly ALL top 100 Android, iOS paid apps hacked
Attack of the Clones? Yeah, but much, much scarier – report
Be real, Apple: In-app goodie grab games AREN'T FREE – EU
Cupertino stands down after Euro legal threats
SLURP! Flick your TONGUE around our LOLLIPOP – Google
Android 5 is coming – IF you're lucky enough to have the right gadget
Microsoft: Your Linux Docker containers are now OURS to command
New tool lets admins wrangle Linux apps from Windows
Facebook, working on Facebook at Work, works on Facebook. At Work
You don't want your cat or drunk pics at the office
Soz, web devs: Google snatches its Wallet off the table
Killing off web service in 3 months... but app-happy bonkers are fine
prev story

Whitepapers

Why and how to choose the right cloud vendor
The benefits of cloud-based storage in your processes. Eliminate onsite, disk-based backup and archiving in favor of cloud-based data protection.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Beginner's guide to SSL certificates
De-mystify the technology involved and give you the information you need to make the best decision when considering your online security options.
Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile
Data demand and the rise of virtualization is challenging IT teams to deliver storage performance, scalability and capacity that can keep up, while maximizing efficiency.