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OmniVision flashes 14.6Mp image sensor

Cameraphone addicts rejoice

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The megapixel glass ceiling has risen once more thanks to OmniVision, which has launched a range of 14.6Mp image sensors for compact cameras and cameraphones.

Capable of delivering high-resolution still photography and full 1080p video at speeds of up to 60fps, the OV14810 sensor has been design for integration into compact cameras and camcorders.

The OV14825 variant will be sold as an imaging application for mobile phones.

The 1/2.33in chips have an active array of 4416 x 3312 backside illumination pixels, OmniVision said, and during full HD video mode can also supposedly provide additional pixels to cope with image stabilisation.

Both models will result in lower bill of materials costs for manufacturers and in imaging gadgets with a reduced power consumption, OmniVision promised.

Exactly when the first compact cameras, camcorders or cameraphones with either the OV14810 or OV14825 chip inside will hit is the market is unknown, though OmniVision said both will enter mass production during the second quarter of 2010. ®

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