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HDS hails new high-end storage

Box fresh USP-V

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Hitachi Data Systems has confirmed it has a next-generation high-end storage product coming.

The current high-end storage array is the USP-V, standing for Universal Storage Processor-Virtual. Hu Yoshida, HDS' high profile blogger and chief technology officer (CTO), mentions it in his latest blog, saying: "The USP V can start with 32 processors and scale out to 128 processors. It can also loosely couple to another USP V or to the next generation USP V for non disruptive tech refresh.

"The USP-V has... also [been] designed to couple to the next generation USP-V without application downtime."

We discussed a coming refresh of the USP-V in October last year. Given Hitachi's OEM relationship with HP, which bases its XP array on USP-V technology, we might assume that HP is happy with the redesigned product's feature set. We might take a similar tack with Sun which resells the USP-V from Hitachi Data Systems.

Since HDS is now openly blogging about the new product, the suggestion is that it could be announced - if not shipped - this year rather than in 2011. Look for more teasers from HDS before then. ®

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