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Speculative Googlenetbook specs surface

'A Ferrari for the price of a Mini Cooper'

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Mere days after the first rumors of an impending Google-built netbook hit the web, purported details of its innards have surfaced.

Rumors of a Googlebook mirror the speculation that preceded the emergence earlier this month of Mountain View's HTC-manufactured, Android-powered Googlephone Nexus One smartphone.

Those Googlephone rumors have now been proven true, with Google confirming the Nexus One on December 12 and the rumor mill projecting that it will go on sale - sorry, by invitation only - next Tuesday.

The Googlebook remains far more chimerical - although according to London's IBTimes it will be "a Ferrari for the price of a Mini Cooper."

The IBTimes report is based on the flimsiest of "it is reported" sources - but for the record, here's what the Londoners say will grace the rumored entry of Mountain View into the netbook market - which, by the way, other rumors have said won't occur until late 2010 at the earliest:

  • ARM CPU
  • Nvidia Tegra HD-capable graphics
  • 10.1-inch TFT display
  • Multi-touch UI
  • 64GB flash drive
  • 2GB RAM
  • WiFi (no flavor specified)
  • 3G connectivity
  • Bluetooth
  • Ethernet
  • USB ports
  • Webcam
  • 3.5mm audio jack
  • Multi-card reader
  • and finally, the ever-popular "etc."

All this for a subsidized "sub-$300" price tag.

Did we mention that these are mere rumors? However, with Chrome OS beginning to emerge into the light of day, and with Google testing the service, support, and fulfillment complexities of the hardware-business waters with the Nexus One, it's not inconceivable that the company could be investigating a Google-branded netbook offering.

We'll wait for more-concrete evidence of a Googlebook to surface before we begin to debate such IBTimes assertions as that an ARM CPU would perform better than an Intel Atom. Late 2010 is quite a while in the future, and with the release of its new Pine Trail Atoms last week and with Moorestown on track for later in 2010, Intel has a few ARM-wrestling tricks up its sleeves. ®

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