Feeds

Fujitsu workers picket London HQ

'Paid a pittance' staff come out in force against services firm

Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile

Disgruntled Fujitsu Services' employees protested at the firm's London headquarters today to mark the start of strike action by Unite union members - many of whom are disgusted at the management's stance on pay, pension and jobs.

The walkout signals the beginning of what could be a series of stoppages stretching into the New Year, if Fujitsu bosses fail to meet the demands of its unhappy workers.

Fujitsu picket line

Fujitsu picket line in chilly London earlier today

Unite IT and communications national officer, Peter Skyte, told The Register that the union and its members hoped that today's action would be enough to convince Fujitsu management to rethink its position on pay, pensions and job cuts.

Speaking at the picket line outside Fujitsu's HQ in Baker Street, London, he said Unite wants the company to back away from its plans to axe 1,200 UK workers.

"Compulsory redundancy is simply unacceptable, especially considering that Fujitsu is expecting record earnings next year," he said.

Skyte added that union members at Fujitsu had a "great deal of support" from the company's 11,000 workers in the UK.

"Turnout has been strong around the country today, and this demonstrates how deep the feelings are against Fujitsu management," he said.

However, he didn't confirm how many people had joined the strike action at Fujitsu today.

The union is calling on Fujitsu to avoid compulsory lay-offs, improve pay for its workers and offer a decent pension, said Skyte.

Fujitsu employee Dave Seymour, who has worked at the company for nine years as a workstation assessor on the services' outfit's Home Office account, slammed Fujitsu management.

Fujitsu strike

Fujitsu worker, Dave Seymour, adopts Scrooge outfit to bring home message to 'tight' bosses

"Roger Gilbert [Fujitsu CEO] is tight," he claimed.

"I'm paid a bloody pittance and have only had four crappy pay rises since I've been working here."

Seymour told El Reg that he currently earns £18,000 per year, and said he would continue to strike in the hope that Fujitsu bosses will eventually sit-up and listen to the firm's unhappy UK staff.

"I'm losing money standing here today, but I'm not going to give up," he said.

Fujitsu was concise in its response. "Fujitsu has taken prudent measures to ensure that service to its customers is maintained," said a company spokesman. ®

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

More from The Register

next story
Ellison: Sparc M7 is Oracle's most important silicon EVER
'Acceleration engines' key to performance, security, Larry says
Oracle SHELLSHOCKER - data titan lists unpatchables
Database kingpin lists 32 products that can't be patched (yet) as GNU fixes second vuln
Lenovo to finish $2.1bn IBM x86 server gobble in October
A lighter snack than expected – but what's a few $100m between friends, eh?
Ello? ello? ello?: Facebook challenger in DDoS KNOCKOUT
Gets back up again after half an hour though
Troll hunter Rackspace turns Rotatable's bizarro patent to stone
News of the Weird: Screen-rotating technology declared unpatentable
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.