Feeds

Asus at work on Android-based 'Eee Bot'

You know, for kids

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

Asus' next Eee product will ban a 'droid running 'Droid, it has been claimed.

Called the Eee Bot, it'll be an education-centric automaton designed to interact with kids. It will be controlled by software derived from Google's open source Android OS, PCWorld reports.

Don't expect the device to appear any time soon, though. Apparently, it'll be two years before the Eee Bot is ready to go into production, and then only on what's described as a trial basis.

That timeframe suggests that the Eee Bot - for which there are no other details at present - will be more sophisticated that the basic Turtle-style droids used in schools today to help teach kids the basics behind programming and logic.

Development of the 'droid, which is being driven by the Taiwanese government, will centre on equipping it with advanced abilities to interact with people - voice synthesis and recognition, presumably - the ability to see and to use location data to help it navigate around home and class furniture, kids, teachers and so on. ®

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup

Whitepapers

Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Endpoint data privacy in the cloud is easier than you think
Innovations in encryption and storage resolve issues of data privacy and key requirements for companies to look for in a solution.
Why cloud backup?
Combining the latest advancements in disk-based backup with secure, integrated, cloud technologies offer organizations fast and assured recovery of their critical enterprise data.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?