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Nokia N900 to hit Vodafone next month

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Vodafone looks set to become UK first operator to release Nokia’s N900 smartphone-cum-tablet.

Nokia announced late last month that only those who pre-ordered the Maemo-based device through its website would receive the phone in December. The firm claimed that the sheer volume of advance orders forced it to put back the handset’s full-scale UK rollout to January 2010.

Nokia N900

Nokia said high demand forced it to delay UK N900 delivery

Vodafone has since launched a website for the N900, and it's taking orders already, though it has only promised that the device will be available on its network at some point next month.

Pricing information hasn’t been announced, though Nokia and online retailer Expansys both charge £500 ($813/€559) for the smartphone.

Nokia’s N900 features an ARM-based Cortex-A8 processor and up to 1GB of application memory. User-accessible memory tops out at 32GB, but is expandable to 48GB using Micro SD cards.

The N900’s other treats include 10Mb/s HSDPA 3G, Wi-Fi, Assisted GPS, a slide-out Qwerty keyboard, an FM transmitter and a 5Mp camera. ®

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