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Fujitsu recalls 'fire risk' laptop batteries

Red sky at night, Amilo alight?

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Just when you though it was safe to start using lithium-ion laptop batteries again*, Fujitsu has admitted that some of its power packs have been the subject of claims that they overheat and could catch fire.

The PC maker has asked owners of a trio of models in its Amilo P range of notebooks to return their laptops' batteries pronto in exchange for free replacements.

The machines in question are the Amilo Pa2510, Pi2512 and Pi2515, sold between April 2007 and June 2009, Fujitsu said. Anyone who has one of these machines should power down, remove the battery and start up again on mains power.

No other Fujitsu laptops are affected by the battery recall, the company stressed, and added that only a "limited" number of punters have experienced batteries that have become too hot during use.

Laptop owners affected by recall - and anyone else who suspects they might be - can find out more here. ®

*Yes, we do know no one - ourselves included - ever really stopped.

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