Feeds

Liverpool declares itself an ID-free zone

Labour members back non-cooperation vote

Gartner critical capabilities for enterprise endpoint backup

Liverpool City Council passed a motion last night vowing not to co-operate with Home Office plans to extend its ID card trial to the city early next year.

Liverpool and Blackburn have been apparently been chosen for the next stage of the trial - the cards are currently being piloted in Manchester.

The Lib Dem council said it reiterated its opposition to the scheme. It will refuse to co-operate with promotion of the card using council resources or premises, unless forced to do so by law. Finally the council will work with organisations like NO2ID, which campaign against the card.

For its part, NO2ID congratulated the council, and particularly Labour members, for not being fooled by the Home Office.

Phil Booth, national coordinator for the lobby group, said: "Neither the people of Liverpool nor their elected representatives have been conned. We particularly congratulate Labour councillors for taking their constituents’ sides against the Home Office’s favourite surveillance scheme, even if a Labour Home Secretary complacently lets the bureaucrats steam on, spending uncounted millions in the biggest ID theft of all."

Liverpool Council noted that despite Labour minister claims, the cards will not prevent crime, terrorism or illegal immigration, but would instead change the relationship between citizen and state.

An outright refusal to allow council premises to be used to tout the ID card might have thrown up some possible roadblocks to the card in the city.

However, Liverpool's position, on the face of it, seems set to be as much of a threat to the gov's programme as Islington's self-designation as nuclear free zone was to the UK's nuke weapons policy in the 1980s.

The Home Office will give an update on its ID Card pilot next week. ®

Gartner critical capabilities for enterprise endpoint backup

More from The Register

next story
'Stop dissing Google or quit': OK, I quit, says Code Club co-founder
And now a message from our sponsors: 'STFU or else'
Ex US cybersecurity czar guilty in child sex abuse website case
Health and Human Services IT security chief headed online to share vile images
Uber, Lyft and cutting corners: The true face of the Sharing Economy
Casual labour and tired ideas = not really web-tastic
Don't even THINK about copyright violation, says Indian state
Pre-emptive arrest for pirates in Karnataka
The police are WRONG: Watching YouTube videos is NOT illegal
And our man Corfield is pretty bloody cross about it
Oz biz regulator discovers shared servers in EPIC FACEPALM
'Not aware' that one IP can hold more than one Website
Apple tried to get a ban on Galaxy, judge said: NO, NO, NO
Judge Koh refuses Samsung ban for the third time
Pedals and wheel in that Google robo-car or it's off the road – Cali DMV
And insists on $5 million insurance per motor against accidents
prev story

Whitepapers

Top 10 endpoint backup mistakes
Avoid the ten endpoint backup mistakes to ensure that your critical corporate data is protected and end user productivity is improved.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Backing up distributed data
Eliminating the redundant use of bandwidth and storage capacity and application consolidation in the modern data center.
The essential guide to IT transformation
ServiceNow discusses three IT transformations that can help CIOs automate IT services to transform IT and the enterprise
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.