Feeds

Rambus soothes EC ire with lower prices

Antitrust charges dropped

The essential guide to IT transformation

The European Commission is letting Rambus off the hook now that the US firm has offered to cap licensing rates for some of its industry-standard chip technology.

Europe's top antitrust regulator said Wednesday it has dropped charges against Rambus, makes no finding of liability, and will levy no fine against the company.

Under the EC settlement announced on Wednesday, Rambus promises to offer licenses with maximum royalty rates worldwide for certain memory types and memory controllers going forward.

The American memory chip designer has been fighting allegations that it intentionally concealed that it had patents and patent applications connected to DRAM chips, which later became an industry standard. It's accused of charging abusive licensing rates for the technology once its "patent ambush" was sprung.

Rambus has now agreed to charge no royalties for the single data rate (SDR) and double data rate (DDR) chip standards that were adopted when Rambus was a member of the standards-setting body. In addition, it will place a 1.5 per cent maximum royalty rate for later generations of DRAM standards, DDR2 and DDR3 — down from its original rate of 3.5 per cent. Rambus has agreed to offer this rate worldwide.

The EC settlement, however, is unlikely to have an effect on US lawsuits filed against Rambus by memory makers. An EC press release about the deal states the commission is "not taking any position on ongoing litigation involving Rambus, such as, for example that linked to patent law."

Rambus' European settlement follows a victory against antitrust regulators in the US. After seven years of battling Rambus in court, the US Federal Trade Commission in May officially dropped charges against the firm after repeatedly failing to show adequate evidence that the royalty rates Rambus was charging resulted in a less competitive market. ®

Gartner critical capabilities for enterprise endpoint backup

More from The Register

next story
So, Apple won't sell cheap kit? Prepare the iOS garden wall WRECKING BALL
It can throw the low cost race if it looks to the cloud
Apple's iWatch? They cannae do it ... they don't have the POWER
Analyst predicts fanbois will have to wait until next year
AMD unveils 'single purpose' graphics card for PC gamers and NO ONE else
Chip maker claims the Radeon R9 285 is 'best in its class'
Apple promises to lift Curse of the Drained iPhone 5 Battery
Have you tried turning it off and...? Never mind, here's a replacement
Barnes & Noble: Swallow a Samsung Nook tablet, please ... pretty please
Novelslab finally on sale with ($199 - $20) price tag
Apple to build WORLD'S BIGGEST iStore in Dubai
It's not the size of your shiny-shiny...
Just in case? Unverified 'supersize me' iPhone 6 pics in sneak leak peek
Is bigger necessarily better for the fruity firm's flagship phone?
prev story

Whitepapers

Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Endpoint data privacy in the cloud is easier than you think
Innovations in encryption and storage resolve issues of data privacy and key requirements for companies to look for in a solution.
Scale data protection with your virtual environment
To scale at the rate of virtualization growth, data protection solutions need to adopt new capabilities and simplify current features.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?