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Cool-er e-book reader to gain 3G, Wi-FI models

Mid-2010 launch

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

The Cool-er e-book viewer is about to get even cooler, with manufacturer Interead planning to release 3G and Wi-Fi models.

A “next generation of connected Cool-er e-readers” will be available from mid-2010, the firm said, with the device’s 3G connection resulting from Interead’s golden handshake with US network carrier AT&T.

Interead’s announcement suggests that it is planning to launch one Wi-Fi Cool-er and a separate 3G model, though we hope one sporting both wireless technologies will be available.

Since AT&T is providing the 3G connection, only North American users will be able to take advantage. However, Interead mentioned that TV shopping channel QVC will be selling the next-generation Cool-ers – so there is always hope that QVC UK will be in on the deal.

In related news, Interead has signed a deal with firm NewspaperDirect to make over 1300 newspapers and magazines available to Cool-er devices.

Specific launch dates and prices for the new Cool-er models haven’t been announced. ®

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