Feeds

Cisco to counter HP with Chinese expansion

Claims little trouble in big China

Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile

Cisco has vowed to step up its presence in China as a counter measure in its newfound rivalry with HP.

Once close partners, the two companies became mortal foes this year by striking each other where it hurts most: their core markets. Cisco whacked HP first by launching its own line of blade servers. HP answered the slight this November by announcing it would purchase network equipment vendor 3Com.

While 3Com's reach is relatively small compared to the all-consuming Cisco, it does have a major presence in China. And China is one of the most promising markets out there for selling massive swaths of networking kit.

"I think you will see us continue to expand our focus on China and develop very good relationships there," Cisco CEO John Chambers said on Tuesday during an analyst day at the company's San Jose headquarters. "I've been doing business there for over 20 years, but I think it's time to take it up one more level."

Of course, you won't hear Chambers publicly admit such move is a direct response to HP. He and his underlings like to say that Cisco doesn't base its decisions on what its competition is doing. But there does seem to be an awful lot of happy coincidences.

Later that day, Chambers continued with his thoughts on investing in China: "The fact that I've indicated 'stay tuned because you're going to see us continue to commit both resources and talent in China' means we're very comfortable with our ability to compete there." He then noted that Cisco only has a meaningful presence in about 12 Chinese cities at present and will first decide who its partners will be for the expansion and what specific channels to pursue.

Still, Chambers clearly has a healthy paranoia about future rivalries that will come from China — 3Comian or otherwise.

"Our competitors in the future are going to be from China, we know that," he said. "They'll come at us with dramatically lower price." But Chambers claims that like other market battles, Cisco won't respond with lower prices itself. He said that innovation combined with keen operational execution and a unified vision are the selling points it will stand on.

"You'll notice we normally don't enter a market where stand-alone price is the issue," Chambers said. "We enter architectural plays."

He argues that most of its major customers are looking for a wide-ranging solution rather than the price of an individual box. Unless, of course, a potential customer makes a stink about it.

"If someone is making a decision on a stand-alone box, then price perhaps is the key issue. And we will be competitive where appropriate there." ®

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

More from The Register

next story
Ellison: Sparc M7 is Oracle's most important silicon EVER
'Acceleration engines' key to performance, security, Larry says
Oracle SHELLSHOCKER - data titan lists unpatchables
Database kingpin lists 32 products that can't be patched (yet) as GNU fixes second vuln
Lenovo to finish $2.1bn IBM x86 server gobble in October
A lighter snack than expected – but what's a few $100m between friends, eh?
Ello? ello? ello?: Facebook challenger in DDoS KNOCKOUT
Gets back up again after half an hour though
Troll hunter Rackspace turns Rotatable's bizarro patent to stone
News of the Weird: Screen-rotating technology declared unpatentable
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.