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Schmidt succumbs to Twitter

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Google CEO Eric Schmidt has apparently joined Twitter, giving the world a peek into what he thinks and who he thinks is thinking things worth thinking about.

@ericschmidt0 broke cover over the weekend - a mere six months or so after he dissed the service as a poor man's email.

Presumably he no longer feels this is the case - rather it appears that despite the zero he's attached to his moniker, Eric thinks the micro-blogging service is the perfect way for the rich and powerful to show everyone what they're doing.

Thus his first two outpourings are a link to an opinion piece he did on the Wall Street Journal - on the relationship between online news and newspapers - and an interview he did with CNN.

At the same time, he's managed to pull together a 70-strong following list, headed up by Barack Obama, and self-help guru Tony Robbins.

Others include Paul Krugman, the Princeton economist who liberals think should be running the US economy. Also on the list is Arianna Huffington, who has of course demonstrated how news can translate onto the web, mainly by not paying contributors.

Current Calfornia governor Arnie is also on Eric's list, as is Meg Whitman who may be replacing Arnie if she gets her way. Carly Fiorina, ex-HP boss and senate hopeful, is also there.

Culturally, Schmidt shows he's a man of broad and catholic tastes, by following Janet Jackson, 50 Cent and the Dixie Chicks.

For the last ten hours, Eric has been silent - presumably plotting his next move. A move which many apparently expect to be a takeover bid for Twitter, now he's endorsed the platform.

Of course it could simply be the case that Eric had an idle few minutes to fill in on a Sunday morning bewteen plotting more ways to track us all across the web.

After all, other twitterers he's following include Google PR chief Rachel Whetstone, who managed two tweets way back in February, and has since maintained complete and utter twit silence. ®

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