Feeds

Tech-savvy UK kids = (over)confident writers

OMGYG2BK!

3 Big data security analytics techniques

UK children who blog or share their lives on social networking sites are better writers than those who don't.

Or at least they think they are.

A new study by the National Literacy Trust surveyed 3,001 English and Scottish students ages 9 through 16 and discovered that not only do wee bloggers enjoy writing more than their non-bloggophiliac peers by a 57 to 40 per cent margin, but they're also more confident about their writing skills.

And that love of linguistic self-expression isn't limited to adolescent self-absorption. Bloggers also preferred writing to family and friends more than non-bloggers did, 79 to 55 per cent.

But this affection for writing appears to be determined by sex. Only 38 per cent of boys enjoy writing, compared with 52 per cent of girls. More boys found writing to be "boring" than girls as well: 57 versus 41 per cent. Boys also thought that writing was more for girls than boys - 60 versus 43 per cent - which may be one reason why girls were more likely to have blogs than boys: 33 versus 18 per cent.

But what kids meant by "writing" is a bit amorphous. The students' writing experiences included sending text messages (82 per cent), sending AIM or MSN instant messages (73 per cent), and adding comments on social-networking sites (63 per cent) - hardly vehicles for the next Nabokov or Henry James.

Hidden in the mountains of data in the 52-page report (PDF) are a few discomfiting stats. For example, only 77 per cent of the students wrote notes or answers in class or for homework "at least once a month." Call us old-fashioned, but if the UK school system requires only 77 per cent of its students to write a homework assignment at least once a month, something is quite amiss, indeed.

Then there's the less-than-uplifting information that many of the students thought they were good writers because they knew how to type (36 per cent) or spell (33 per cent). Couple those stats with the fact that 23 per cent thought they were poor writers because they were "not very good at writing neatly," and it seems that UK students' definition of good writing may induce E.B. White to spin a bit in his current Brooklin, Maine resting place. ®

Top three mobile application threats

More from The Register

next story
Audio fans, prepare yourself for the Second Coming ... of Blu-ray
High Fidelity Pure Audio – is this what your ears have been waiting for?
Record labels sue Pandora over vintage song royalties
Companies want payout on recordings made before 1972
Zucker punched: Google gobbles Facebook-wooed Titan Aerospace
Up, up and away in my beautiful balloon flying broadband-bot
Apple DOMINATES the Valley, rakes in more profit than Google, HP, Intel, Cisco COMBINED
Cook & Co. also pay more taxes than those four worthies PLUS eBay and Oracle
Intel sees 'signs of improvement in the PC business' but earnings remain 'Meh...'
Prospects for the future, however, please Wall Street money men
What's a right pain in the ASCII for IBM? Its own leech-like hardware biz
Keep your eyes on our cloud while we remove this pesky thing, say execs
Oracle's Larry Ellison has the MOST MASSIVE PACKAGE IN PUBLIC
Billionaire IT baron earns twice as much as the next in line, Disney chief Bob Iger
prev story

Whitepapers

Mainstay ROI - Does application security pay?
In this whitepaper learn how you and your enterprise might benefit from better software security.
Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction
Based on their experience using HP ArcSight Enterprise Security Manager for IT security operations, Finansbank moved to HP ArcSight ESM for fraud management.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Top three mobile application threats
Learn about three of the top mobile application security threats facing businesses today and recommendations on how to mitigate the risk.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.