Feeds

Zero-day Adobe bug overshadows impending Flash fix

Illustrator illin'

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

Fears over a reportedly unpatched flaw in Adobe Illustrator have been heightened by the release of exploit code.

A zero-day flaw in the vector graphics editor means that users tricked into opening maliciously manipulated Encapsulated Postscript Files (.eps) files are liable to find themselves hacked. Successful exploitation of the unpatched flaw triggers a memory corruption bug that clears the path towards the execution of malware on vulnerable systems.

Security notification firm Secunia reports that both Illustrator CS3 13.0.0 and CS4 14.0.0 are affected, adding that a published exploit works on fully patched Windows XP machines. Other versions of Illustrator may also be vulnerable.

Adobe acknowledged a potential problem in at least Illustrator CS4, which it said it was investigating.

Adobe is aware of a report of a potential vulnerability in Adobe Illustrator CS4 (CVE-2009-4195). We are currently investigating this issue and will have an update once we have more information. It appears that this issue would require a local user to take the action of opening a malicious .eps file in Illustrator.

The software firm's delayed quarterly patch update is due next Tuesday, a date that coincides with Microsoft's Patch Tuesday release. Adobe's security response team will have their work cut out to develop and test a patch in time.

Tuesday's releases from Adobe are due to include an update addressing a critical flaw in its Flash player software. The critical update for Adobe Flash Player 10.0.32.18 and earlier versions is due to be accompanied by a security fix for Adobe AIR 1.5.2, also addressing a critical vulnerability.

The ubiquity of Adobe software has made it a favourite target for hacking attacks over the last year or so. Booby-trapped PDF exploits have become a particular favourite in targeted attacks.

Flash exploits have also become a weapon of choice as miscreants have extended their sights beyond attacks against Internet Explorer and booby-trapped Microsoft Office document files. In response, Adobe has adopted a regular patch schedule. ®

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

More from The Register

next story
Knock Knock tool makes a joke of Mac AV
Yes, we know Macs 'don't get viruses', but when they do this code'll spot 'em
Shellshock over SMTP attacks mean you can now ignore your email
'But boss, the Internet Storm Centre says it's dangerous for me to reply to you'
Why weasel words might not work for Whisper
CEO suspends editor but privacy questions remain
Feds seek potential 'second Snowden' gov doc leaker – report
Hang on, Ed wasn't here when we compiled THIS document
DEATH by PowerPoint: Microsoft warns of 0-day attack hidden in slides
Might put out patch in update, might chuck it out sooner
China is ALREADY spying on Apple iCloud users, claims watchdog
Attack harvests users' info at iPhone 6 launch
NOT OK GOOGLE: Android images can conceal code
It's been fixed, but hordes won't have applied the upgrade
prev story

Whitepapers

Cloud and hybrid-cloud data protection for VMware
Learn how quick and easy it is to configure backups and perform restores for VMware environments.
Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Saudi Petroleum chooses Tegile storage solution
A storage solution that addresses company growth and performance for business-critical applications of caseware archive and search along with other key operational systems.
How to simplify SSL certificate management
Simple steps to take control of SSL certificates across the enterprise, and recommendations centralizing certificate management throughout their lifecycle.