Feeds

2009's Top Solid-State Drives

High speed storage with no moving parts

Reducing security risks from open source software

Kit of the Year Solid-state drives have yet to truly challenge magnetic media when it comes to storage capacity and the price you pay for it. But 2009 saw a bumper crop of SSDs as Flash and storage specialists really tried to drive performance.

Some even pushed low capacity but cheap drives in a bid not to replace the HDD but to work alongside it...

Kingston SSD Now V 40GB

Kingston SSD Now V 40GB
RH Editor's Choice

Kingston has delivered a disguised Intel X25-M that will transform your PC for a trivial amount of cash. The 40GB SSD Now V delivers on read performance and that’s exactly what you need when you’re starting Windows or loading an application off the disk and into memory. Provided punters can handle the discipline of uninstalling unwanted application and games, we predict that the Kingston will make massive inroads into the desktop market.

Read the full review
Reg Rating 90%
Price £70 (standalone drive), £75 (desktop upgrade kit)

Crucial CT256M225 256GB

Crucial CT256M225
RH Recommended Medal

There’s no denying that the thick end of £400 is a hefty price to pay for storage, but with the M225, Crucial is delivering superb value for money and a level of performance that is quite astounding. This 256GB SSD delivers in every department and shows that you can get performance and decent capacity at a reasonable price.

Read the full review
Reg Rating 90%
Price £480

Samsung PB22-J 256GB

Samsung 256GB SSD
RH Recommended Medal

An SSD with a capacity large enough for your desktop PC, Samsung's drive hits 256GB yet the price won’t make your eyes water. The up-front cost is high, but on a pound-per-gigabyte basis, it's not half bad. And it's a great performer, too.

Read the full review
Reg Rating 90%
Price £500

Best of the Rest

Patriot Torqx/OCZ Vertex 128GB
Speed champ.

Kingston SSD Now V 128GB
Excellent bang for your solid-state buck.

Intel X25-M (34nm) 160GB
The chip giant's second-gen solid-state drive.

Securing Web Applications Made Simple and Scalable

More from The Register

next story
Child diagnosed as allergic to iPad
Apple's fondleslab is the tablet dermatitis sufferers won't want to take
Microsoft takes on Chromebook with low-cost Windows laptops
Redmond's chief salesman: We're taking 'hard' decisions
For Lenovo US, 8-inch Windows tablets are DEAD – long live 8-inch Windows tablets
Reports it's killing off smaller slabs are greatly exaggerated
Seventh-gen SPARC silicon will accelerate Oracle databases
Uncle Larry's mutually-optimised stack to become clearer in August
EU dons gloves, pokes Google's deals with Android mobe makers
El Reg cops a squint at investigatory letters
Big Blue Apple: IBM to sell iPads, iPhones to enterprises
iOS/2 gear loaded with apps for big biz ... uh oh BlackBerry
prev story

Whitepapers

Reducing security risks from open source software
Follow a few strategies and your organization can gain the full benefits of open source and the cloud without compromising the security of your applications.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
Application security programs and practises
Follow a few strategies and your organization can gain the full benefits of open source and the cloud without compromising the security of your applications.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Consolidation: the foundation for IT and business transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.