Feeds

Russian ransomware blocks net access

New social engineering wheeze appears in east

SANS - Survey on application security programs

Miscreants have developed a ransomware package that blocks internet access in a bid to force infected users into paying up by sending a text message to a premium rate SMS number, lining the pocket of cybercrooks in the process.

The malware comes bundled in a package called uFast Download Manager and targets potential marks in Russia. Users of infected machines are told (via a Russian language message) that they need to send a text message in order to obtain an activation code for the product, which (ironically) poses as a software package designed to increase download speeds. Victims are told that internet access has been blocked in the meantime because of supposed violations of a licensing agreement.

The ploy is a variant on previous ransomware packages that encrypt and block access to document files. One strain of ransomware detected in January 2008 locks up Windows machines, seeking payment via SMS. That threat wasn't specific to Russia and didn't affect a net connection as such but is otherwise very similar to the latest attack.

CA, which detects the threat as RansomSMS-AH, explains how the malware works in greater depth in a blog posting featuring screenshots culled from infected machines here. The anti-virus vendor has developed an activation code generator that allows victims to get online again - providing they can download the utility through an uninfected machine first, of course. ®

High performance access to file storage

More from The Register

next story
Obama allows NSA to exploit 0-days: report
If the spooks say they need it, they get it
Putin tells Snowden: Russia conducts no US-style mass surveillance
Gov't is too broke for that, Russian prez says
Snowden-inspired crypto-email service Lavaboom launches
German service pays tribute to Lavabit
Mounties always get their man: Heartbleed 'hacker', 19, CUFFED
Canadian teen accused of raiding tax computers using OpenSSL bug
Heartbleed exploit, inoculation, both released
File under 'this is going to hurt you more than it hurts me'
Arts and crafts store Michaels says 3 million credit cards exposed in breach
Meanwhile, Target investigators prepare for long process in nabbing hackers
Canadian taxman says hundreds pierced by Heartbleed SSL skewer
900 social insurance numbers nicked, says revenue watchman
prev story

Whitepapers

SANS - Survey on application security programs
In this whitepaper learn about the state of application security programs and practices of 488 surveyed respondents, and discover how mature and effective these programs are.
Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction
Based on their experience using HP ArcSight Enterprise Security Manager for IT security operations, Finansbank moved to HP ArcSight ESM for fraud management.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Top three mobile application threats
Learn about three of the top mobile application security threats facing businesses today and recommendations on how to mitigate the risk.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.