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Half of Sony tellies to go 3D by 2013, says exec

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Half of the new TVs Sony releases will be 3D capable by 2013, the electronics giant has claimed. But it admitted that hardware sales will be governed by the availability of content.

Speaking earlier this week in Japan, Hiroshi Yoshioka, Executive Deputy President of Sony, revealed that 3D sets will account for between 30 and 50 per cent of all Sony TVs sold by the end of the firm’s 2013 fiscal year, which will end on 31 March 2013.

Sony first announced plans to sell 3D TVs globally in September 2009. The company has since said it expects to generate revenue in excess of ¥1tn (£7bn/$11.4bn/€7.7bn) from 3D products, including TVs and games consoles, according to a report by the Wall Street Journal.

Just before the annual IFA tech trade fair kicked off in Berlin in September 2009, Sony boss Sir Howard Stringer revealed plans to make Sony’s Vaio laptops and Blu-ray Disc players compatible with 3D technology.

Sony has since promised that the PlayStation 3 will go 3D during 2010.

Yoshioka admitted, though, that sales of 3D such hardware will still be dependent upon the availability of 3D content, such as films and videogames. ®

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