Feeds

We're going for optimised workload delivery...

Are we nearly there yet?

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

High performance access to file storage

Workshop Who wouldn’t want IT to be delivered in a more dynamic, flexible, agile, [insert your least detested buzzword here] way? Optimal configurations for server and desktop workload delivery have been discussed, and indeed, attempted, for many years. So how close are we to really nailing this?

The answer to this question may depend on what your view of ‘optimal’ is, and this will surely depend on the workloads in question. Availability and stability may be the key requirements for a software application, whereas throughput may be most important factor for a transaction-processing engine. But application workloads are also dependent on the kit you have to run them on, and the management tools at your disposal. There are other factors as well, not least of which being users’ expectations.

So the first question becomes, how to establish a baseline picture which draws together the expectations from the business on the one hand, and the requirements and dependencies of the underlying infrastructure on the other? This can be tough, as we know from numerous research studies. The ‘fun’ doesn’t end there however, as the gaps between user expectations and the actual environment result in questions about exactly what needs to be resolved, and how.

Much of this boils down to deciding which elements of service delivery matter the most. Response times are the ‘old faithful’ of SLAs, but they mask criteria such as availability, scalability and accessibility wherever a user happens to be. These are important factors, of course – but from an infrastructure perspective they are as much symptoms of a well-engineered server environment, managed properly, as anything.

Considering the former, we know that organisations are often prepared to take a gamble with the resilience features they build into the infrastructure. And as for the latter, i.e. good management, we have learned from a number of studies that while things are not broken, they could always be improved.

However, could the question of ‘optimisation’ be fundamentally unanswerable due to it being a moving target? Future demands for scalability and performance, for example, will ask new questions when it comes to delivering current workloads. All you might care about today is keeping pace with the demands of the business. This, of course then begs the question, just how rapidly do the demands for service vary in your organisation?

If things are static, then keeping things running without too many user complaints may be all you need to do in terms of optimising your infrastructure, at least until someone brings in some new challenge from on high. Perhaps a desire to save money is driving you to review your infrastructure at the moment, for example.

If, on the other hand, the demands of your users vary frequently, are you indeed seeking the better way when it comes to optimising how your IT is managed and delivered? A number of options purport to help in this area. For example, are you actively seeking to make use of virtualisation technologies to enable you to manage service delivery as dynamically as the business requires? Maybe you are even considering using cloud-based IT resources to make up for any short term in-house constraints?

From a practical point of view, does your IT shop lack the wherewithal to make ‘optimisation’ an ongoing thing, or are you fully tooled up and ready for dynamic IT service delivery? Come to that, do you or your business users either want or need dynamically managed IT services? If you believe we’re on the brink of what could really be called optimal IT delivery, or indeed if you think all such ideas are just pie in the sky, we’d be interested to hear. ®

High performance access to file storage

More from The Register

next story
Report: Apple seeking to raise iPhone 6 price by a HUNDRED BUCKS
'Well, that 5c experiment didn't go so well – let's try the other direction'
Video games make you NASTY AND VIOLENT
Especially if you are bad at them and keep losing
Zucker punched: Google gobbles Facebook-wooed Titan Aerospace
Up, up and away in my beautiful balloon flying broadband-bot
Microsoft lobs pre-release Windows Phone 8.1 at devs who dare
App makers can load it before anyone else, but if they do they're stuck with it
Nvidia gamers hit trifecta with driver, optimizer, and mobile upgrades
Li'l Shield moves up to Android 4.4.2 KitKat, GameStream comes to notebooks
Gimme a high S5: Samsung Galaxy S5 puts substance over style
Biometrics and kid-friendly mode in back-to-basics blockbuster
AMD unveils Godzilla's graphics card – 'the world's fastest, period'
The Radeon R9 295X2: Water-cooled, 5,632 stream processors, 11.5TFLOPS
Sony battery recall as VAIO goes out with a bang, not a whimper
The perils of having Panasonic as a partner
NORKS' own smartmobe pegged as Chinese landfill Android
Fake kit in the hermit kingdom? That's just Kim Jong-un-believable!
prev story

Whitepapers

Mainstay ROI - Does application security pay?
In this whitepaper learn how you and your enterprise might benefit from better software security.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Mobile application security study
Download this report to see the alarming realities regarding the sheer number of applications vulnerable to attack, as well as the most common and easily addressable vulnerability errors.