Feeds

Facebookers hit with steamy clickjacking exploit

'Click da button, baby!'

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk

Facebook administrators have blocked a clickjacking exploit that displayed images of a scantily clad woman on profile pages without first prompting the user for permission.

The attack began when a victim encountered the image of the near-naked woman on a friend's profile page along with the words "Want 2 C something hot? Click da button, baby!" Facebookers who took the bait - and were logged in to their accounts at the time - found their profile pages were updated to include the same image. The more people who fell for the come-on, the more the come-on was presented to new potential victims, giving the attack a viral quality.

Researchers who first spotted the ruse attributed it to a CSRF, or cross-site request forgery, vulnerability on Facebook's site. A spokesman for the social networking site disputed that explanation, saying the attack was really the result of clickjacking.

"This problem isn’t specific to Facebook, but we’re always working to improve our systems and are building additional protections against this type of behavior," Facebook spokesman Simon Axten wrote in an email. "We’ve blocked the URL associated with this site, and we’re cleaning up the relatively few cases where it was posted (something email providers, for example, can’t do)."

Clickjacking is a vulnerability at the core of the web that allows webmasters to trick users into clicking on a link they didn't intend to. The exploits are pulled off by superimposing an invisible iframe over a button or link. Virtually every website and browser is susceptible to the technique. Websites that accept user-generated content make especially potent launch pads for such attacks.

This latest attack is a reminder that it's often impossible to know where a given link will lead, even for careful users. Indeed, Gadi Evron, one of the security researchers who first spotted the exploit, confessed to having his Facebook page briefly display the image after first encountering it on a friend's page.

"This shows that even experts can become complacent and trust systems when they really shouldn't," he wrote. ®

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

More from The Register

next story
SMASH the Bash bug! Apple and Red Hat scramble for patch batches
'Applying multiple security updates is extremely difficult'
Shellshock: 'Larger scale attack' on its way, warn securo-bods
Not just web servers under threat - though TENS of THOUSANDS have been hit
Apple's new iPhone 6 vulnerable to last year's TouchID fingerprint hack
But unsophisticated thieves need not attempt this trick
Hackers thrash Bash Shellshock bug: World races to cover hole
Update your gear now to avoid early attacks hitting the web
Oracle SHELLSHOCKER - data titan lists unpatchables
Database kingpin lists 32 products that can't be patched (yet) as GNU fixes second vuln
Who.is does the Harlem Shake
Blame it on LOLing XSS terroristas
Researchers tell black hats: 'YOU'RE SOOO PREDICTABLE'
Want to register that domain? We're way ahead of you.
Stunned by Shellshock Bash bug? Patch all you can – or be punished
UK data watchdog rolls up its sleeves, polishes truncheon
prev story

Whitepapers

A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Beginner's guide to SSL certificates
De-mystify the technology involved and give you the information you need to make the best decision when considering your online security options.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.