Feeds

Ubuntu in truffle shuffle with Chrome OS

'Sloth love Chunk'

The Power of One Infographic

Ubuntu’s commercial sponsor Canonical revealed late yesterday that it has been working with Google on its Chrome OS platform since before Mountain View announced its game-changing plans in July this year.

The firm’s OEM veep Chris Kenyon said in a blog post on Thursday that “Canonical is contributing engineering to Google under contract”. His comments came following Google’s announcement that it would open source the Chrome OS.

He didn’t reveal financial terms of the deal, and was at pains to insist that Chrome OS wouldn’t invade Ubuntu’s turf.

“While the two operating systems share some core components, Google Chrome OS will provide a very different experience to Ubuntu,” he said. “Ubuntu will continue to be a general purpose OS running both web and native applications such as OpenOffice and will not require specialised hardware.”

Chrome OS on the other hand will be specifically designed for a hand-picked selection of web-obsessed x86- and (eventually) ARM-based netbooks created by Google’s hardware partners that include big name computer makers such as Hewlett Packard, Asus, Acer, Lenovo.

Dell, which is good at getting its knickers in a twist about Ubuntu being a Microsoft operating system, is notably absent from the list.

Kenyon said Canonical had a cosy get-together with some Google wonks in the past few days at its Ubuntu Developer Summit in Dallas. All of which hints at just how closely tied the two outfits have been on the development of Chrome OS.

“In our discussions, Sundar Pichai and Linus Upson made it clear that they want, wherever feasible, to build on existing components and tools from the open source community without unnecessary re-invention. This clear focus should benefit a wide variety of existing projects and we welcome it,” he said.

And anyway, Canonical has already made its intentions clear that with the release of its desktop Linux platform Ubuntu 9.10, its sights are set on Microsoft and its Windows 7 operating system. ®

Seven Steps to Software Security

More from The Register

next story
Whoah! How many Google Play apps want to read your texts?
Google's app permissions far too lax – security firm survey
Chrome browser has been DRAINING PC batteries for YEARS
Google is only now fixing ancient, energy-sapping bug
Do YOU work at Microsoft? Um. Are you SURE about that?
Nokia and marketing types first to get the bullet, says report
Microsoft takes on Chromebook with low-cost Windows laptops
Redmond's chief salesman: We're taking 'hard' decisions
EU dons gloves, pokes Google's deals with Android mobe makers
El Reg cops a squint at investigatory letters
Big Blue Apple: IBM to sell iPads, iPhones to enterprises
iOS/2 gear loaded with apps for big biz ... uh oh BlackBerry
OpenWRT gets native IPv6 slurping in major refresh
Also faster init and a new packages system
Google shows off new Chrome OS look
Athena springs full-grown from Chromium project's head
prev story

Whitepapers

Top three mobile application threats
Prevent sensitive data leakage over insecure channels or stolen mobile devices.
The Essential Guide to IT Transformation
ServiceNow discusses three IT transformations that can help CIO's automate IT services to transform IT and the enterprise.
Mobile application security vulnerability report
The alarming realities regarding the sheer number of applications vulnerable to attack, and the most common and easily addressable vulnerability errors.
How modern custom applications can spur business growth
Learn how to create, deploy and manage custom applications without consuming or expanding the need for scarce, expensive IT resources.
Consolidation: the foundation for IT and business transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.