Feeds

VTOL gyro-copter flying car mates with killer robot

Droid jump-choppers to be offered to military

Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile

A flying-car company which has struggled for 15 years to win acceptance for its radical gyrocopter/aeroplane technology may have finally broken through into the mainstream. It was announced this week that Carter Aviation technologies - aspiring designer of the CarterCopter Personal Air Vehicle - has partnered with successful military robot maker AAI.

The CarterCopter concept for a 2+2 set PAV. Credit: Carter Aviation

Well you should have gone before we left home.

The CarterCopter is described by its inventors as a "slowed rotor/compound" (SR/C) aircraft. In essence it's an autogyro - a helicopter whose rotors aren't powered but spin freely - with added wings. At slower speeds through the air, the rotor whirls faster and supports most of the CarterCopter's weight.

Going faster, the rotor slows to reduce drag and the wings take on the burden. The machine is driven through the air by one or more normal propellers.

A normal autogyro can land vertically - in the same fashion as a helicopter "autorotating" to an emergency landing - but it can't lift off straight up like a regular chopper. The CarterCopter avoids this, however, using a cunning gadget called a pre-rotator to make a "jump takeoff".

The pre-rotator, not being required to power the rotor when it is driving air, can be quite small and light. It is engaged with the CarterCopter sitting on the ground with blades pitched flat so as to offer zero resistance. The rotors are gradually spun up to very high speed, with their weighted tips allowing a lot of energy to be stored as in a flywheel - and the undercarriage holding the fuselage oriented.

When ready, the rotor pitch is pulled in and the forward driving prop engaged. The whizzing rotor heaves the machine up into the sky and the prop shoves it forward to flying speed. The CarterCopter can't hover in mid-air, but it can "jump" to a surprising height like this, clearing 50 foot buildings without bother.

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

More from The Register

next story
PORTAL TO ELSEWHERE scried in small galaxy far, far away
Supermassive black hole dominates titchy star formation
Boffins say they've got Lithium batteries the wrong way around
Surprises at the nano-scale mean our ideas about how they charge could be all wrong
Edge Research Lab to tackle chilly LOHAN's final test flight
Our US allies to probe potential Vulture 2 servo freeze
Europe prepares to INVADE comet: Rosetta landing site chosen
No word yet on whether backup site is labelled 'K'
Cracked it - Vulture 2 power podule fires servos for 4 HOURS
Pixhawk avionics juice issue sorted, onwards to Spaceport America
Archaeologists and robots on hunt for more Antikythera pieces
How much of the world's oldest computer can they find?
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
Intelligent flash storage arrays
Tegile Intelligent Storage Arrays with IntelliFlash helps IT boost storage utilization and effciency while delivering unmatched storage savings and performance.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Beginner's guide to SSL certificates
De-mystify the technology involved and give you the information you need to make the best decision when considering your online security options.