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Stalker video peepholed ESPN bombshell

'Erin Andrews Naked Butt'

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A Chicago man who stalked ESPN reporter Erin Andrews across the United States managed to secretly videotape America's sexiest sportscaster in the nude twice, federal prosecutors said Wednesday.

The eight-month odyssey by Michael David Barrett began in Columbus, Ohio in early 2008 and concluded in Nashville, according to court papers filed in federal court in Los Angeles. On three occasions, he was able to learn where Andrews would be lodging and make reservations to stay in the same hotels, twice in rooms adjacent to hers.

It was during those two stays that Barrett was able to surreptitiously capture video of the naked sportscasting babe through cameras he mounted in her hotel door's peephole. He eventually posted the footage on Google Video and elsewhere under titles such as "Erin Andrews Naked Butt" and "Sexy and Hot Blonde Sports celebrity shows us her all."

Barrett proved to be a determined stalker. In January 2008, he made calls to seven hotels in Columbus to identify where Andrews would be staying during an upcoming visit to the city. He made 14 such calls to Milwaukee-area hotels in July. Between February and September, he followed her to Columbus, Milwaukee, Nashville, and her home state, prosecutors alleged.

Barrett eventually approached celebrity gossip site TMZ to see if it had any interest in paying for the videos. When he was turned down, he posted them online.

Wednesday's criminal information supersedes a criminal complaint that was filed last month. Barrett is charged with one count of interstate stalking, and faces five years in federal prison. Barrett has waived his right to be indicted by a grand jury.

His attorney told TMZ: "Mr. Barrett would like to express his deep regret for the circumstances that have caused the issuance of the charges against him today. It is his sincere hope that this matter can be resolved as soon as possible." ®

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