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California votes in HD TV power pruning law

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Legislators in California have voted to exterminate overly energy-hungry TVs, creating a law that insists the state’s tellies meet strict energy consumption standards.

Set to come into force in 2011, the law will require TVs with screen sizes of 58in or less to consume 33 per cent less electricity than existing models do. For example, a 42in TV must, by 2011, consume no more than 183W.

The law will also require these screen to cut their energy consumption by 49 per cent by the year 2013, compared to today’s levels.

The California Energy Commission (CEC), which approved the standard, claimed the move will have saved sufficient energy by 2021 to power 864,000 single-family homes.

The standard – the first of its kind for a US state – will save $8.1bn (£4.8bn/€5.4bn) in energy costs in California by 2021, the CEC added, while energy firm Pacific Gas & Electric estimated that the move will reduce CO2 emissions by 3m metric tons over one decade.

TVs larger than 58in have apparently been left out as a concession to home cinema retailers and installers – no doubt a thriving business across many wealthy parts of California. ®

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