Feeds

T-Mobile raises Sidekick from the dead

Microsoft meltdown (not) forgotten

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk

T-Mobile resumed sales of its benighted Sidekick smart(ish)phone on Tuesday morning, six weeks after a cloudburst swamped the once-popular status symbol.

In early October, a catastrophic server failure at a Microsoft subsidiary - the all-too-prophetically named Danger - wiped out Sidekick users' personal data that had been stored on the company's cloudy system.

Although the failure was Microsoft's, the damage was borne mostly by T-Mobile, which suffered a debilitating knee in the PR groin due to the loss of faith by its Sidekick customers.

Whatever the cause of the original server suicide, the follow-up data restoration - or, to put it more accurately, the lack of same - vacillated between embarrassment and farce.

And T-Mobile thought the Paris Hilton hacking was damaging to its reputation.

There was a silver lining to this particular cloud, however - although one that may not have been glimpsed by T-Mobile, Microsoft, or Danger: It got people talking about whether cloud-based storage is truly worthy of trust, and whether a data-safety code of practice should be instituted among cloud service providors.

But such talk is too late for Sidekick users. And, possibly, too late for the Sidekick itself - a handset which, as The Reg has pointed out, relies heavily on server-based storage.

So T-Mobile is again offering the Sidekick for sale: the Sidekick LX 2009 at $149.99 and the Sidekick 2008 for $49.99, both with a two year contract.

But after the events of the past six weeks, will anyone care? ®

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk

More from The Register

next story
Brit telcos warn Scots that voting Yes could lead to HEFTY bills
BT and Co: Independence vote likely to mean 'increased costs'
Phones 4u slips into administration after EE cuts ties with Brit mobe retailer
More than 5,500 jobs could be axed if rescue mission fails
New 'Cosmos' browser surfs the net by TXT alone
No data plan? No WiFi? No worries ... except sluggish download speed
Radio hams can encrypt, in emergencies, says Ofcom
Consultation promises new spectrum and hints at relaxed licence conditions
Blockbuster book lays out the first 20 years of the Smartphone Wars
Symbian's David Wood bares all. Not for the faint hearted
'Serious flaws in the Vertigan report' says broadband boffin
Report 'fails reality test' , is 'simply wrong' and offers ''convenient' justification for FTTN says Rod Tucker
This flashlight app requires: Your contacts list, identity, access to your camera...
Who us, dodgy? Vast majority of mobile apps fail privacy test
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
Saudi Petroleum chooses Tegile storage solution
A storage solution that addresses company growth and performance for business-critical applications of caseware archive and search along with other key operational systems.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.