Feeds

Microsoft donates .NET Micro Framework to open source

Apache mercy killing

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

Microsoft has released part of its .NET Framework - the part for internet-connected smart devices - into the open-source community.

The company said on Monday that it's releasing source code for the .NET Micro Framework under an Apache 2.0 license. Microsoft is also creating a community of "interested and involved members to help shape the future direction of the product." The community's web site was still under construction at time of the announcement.

Gates and friends with Spot watches

Happier times: Bill Gates and friends wearing

an early version of the .NET Micro Framework

But don't get too excited. You won't be getting the full .NET Micro Framework stack, as Microsoft's open-source code donation will lack the TCP/IP stack and cryptography libraries. Microsoft said the former has been licensed by a third party, so Microsoft can't release the code, while the latter Microsoft has decided is "used outside of the scope of the .NET Micro Framework." You'll have to use your own alternatives.

Microsoft's embrace of open source follows the company's announcement in May that it was, ahem, changing the .NET Micro Framework's business model after it announced it was cutting 3,000 staff. The company said that it would kill off royalties from distribution of Framework and that the platform would become a community-supported project.

Program Manager Colin Miller vowed Monday on Microsoft's Port 25 blog that Microsoft will remain actively involved in NET Micro Framework's ongoing development, working alongside the community.

The .NET Micro Framework never lived up to the early promise. It morphed out of the Smart Personal Objects Technology (SPOT) unveiled by Bill Gates during his keynote address at the January, 2003 Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas, Nevada.

The idea was for internet-connected watches and coffee makers capable of updating you on the weather and your stock while while giving you the time or brewing up a cup of instant. After from some initial interest, though, the watches and coffee makers never really clicked.

In an earlier blow to SPOT and the .NET Micro Framework, Microsoft announced last month that the data-network-powering SPOT-based services known as MSN Direct will finally be switched off in 2012. ®

Remote control for virtualized desktops

More from The Register

next story
Download alert: Nearly ALL top 100 Android, iOS paid apps hacked
Attack of the Clones? Yeah, but much, much scarier – report
You stupid BRICK! PCs running Avast AV can't handle Windows fixes
Fix issued, fingers pointed, forums in flames
Microsoft: Your Linux Docker containers are now OURS to command
New tool lets admins wrangle Linux apps from Windows
Facebook, working on Facebook at Work, works on Facebook. At Work
You don't want your cat or drunk pics at the office
Soz, web devs: Google snatches its Wallet off the table
Killing off web service in 3 months... but app-happy bonkers are fine
First in line to order a Nexus 6? AT&T has a BRICK for you
Black Screen of Death plagues early Google-mobe batch
prev story

Whitepapers

Why cloud backup?
Combining the latest advancements in disk-based backup with secure, integrated, cloud technologies offer organizations fast and assured recovery of their critical enterprise data.
Getting started with customer-focused identity management
Learn why identity is a fundamental requirement to digital growth, and how without it there is no way to identify and engage customers in a meaningful way.
Driving business with continuous operational intelligence
Introducing an innovative approach offered by ExtraHop for producing continuous operational intelligence.
5 critical considerations for enterprise cloud backup
Key considerations when evaluating cloud backup solutions to ensure adequate protection security and availability of enterprise data.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?