Feeds

Swiss roll Street View into court

Data protection supremo's patience runs out

The essential guide to IT transformation

Switzerland's head of federal data protection has announced that he's taking Google to court after the search monolith refused to comply with several privacy requests regarding its Swiss Street View service.

Google incurred the wrath of Federal Data Protection and Information Commissioner (FDPIC) Hans-Peter Thür back in August, when the service was launched, by not applying sufficient blur to faces and number plates.

He ordered Street View shut down - something which didn't actually happen - and there followed an entertaining series of Google concessions (more blur) and further Swiss demands (even more blur).

Thür then upped the ante by saying the images captured by Street View's all-seeing eye were taken from too high an altitude, thereby laying bare places such as gardens, "with the result that people see more on Street View than can been seen by a normal passer-by in the street".

He also mandated Google to "pay particular attention to blurring such places as hospitals, schools and prisons".

Google declined to reshoot Switzerland with lowered spycams, as it was obliged to do in Japan, saying this would "bring the camera closer to pedestrians".

Thür's patience has now run out, and his office said in a statement: "In its written response on 14 October 2009, Google for the most part declined to comply with the requests. For these reasons, the FDPIC has decided to take the matter further and to take legal action before the Federal Administrative Court."

AFP notes that Google has insisted it's "absolutely convinced that Swiss View is legal in Switzerland." ®

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
'Stop dissing Google or quit': OK, I quit, says Code Club co-founder
And now a message from our sponsors: 'STFU or else'
Ex US cybersecurity czar guilty in child sex abuse website case
Health and Human Services IT security chief headed online to share vile images
Uber, Lyft and cutting corners: The true face of the Sharing Economy
Casual labour and tired ideas = not really web-tastic
Don't even THINK about copyright violation, says Indian state
Pre-emptive arrest for pirates in Karnataka
The police are WRONG: Watching YouTube videos is NOT illegal
And our man Corfield is pretty bloody cross about it
Oz biz regulator discovers shared servers in EPIC FACEPALM
'Not aware' that one IP can hold more than one Website
Apple tried to get a ban on Galaxy, judge said: NO, NO, NO
Judge Koh refuses Samsung ban for the third time
Pedals and wheel in that Google robo-car or it's off the road – Cali DMV
And insists on $5 million insurance per motor against accidents
prev story

Whitepapers

Top 10 endpoint backup mistakes
Avoid the ten endpoint backup mistakes to ensure that your critical corporate data is protected and end user productivity is improved.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Backing up distributed data
Eliminating the redundant use of bandwidth and storage capacity and application consolidation in the modern data center.
The essential guide to IT transformation
ServiceNow discusses three IT transformations that can help CIOs automate IT services to transform IT and the enterprise
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.