Feeds

Mantis Reaper-clone drone flies

BAE rolls out latest Wheel 2.0™ offering

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

UK-headquartered arms globocorp BAE Systems has announced completion of initial flight trials by its large, twin-engined "Mantis" unmanned aircraft above Australia.

Mantis on show at last year's Farnborough airshow

Praying for pork.

“This achievement is testament to the can-do approach of the whole team working on this programme," said BAE killdroid honcho Chris Allam. "It confirms the skill and innovation within the UK aerospace sector.”

The current Mantis is a technology demonstrator jointly funded by the UK Ministry of Defence (MoD) and British aerospace firms. The MoD has thus far refused to divulge details of project costs on the grounds that they are "commercially sensitive", while BAE has stated that the MoD has requested the secrecy.

The 20m-wingspan Mantis, should it be put into production, would be in the same general class as the existing "Predator-B", aka the "Reaper", which is already in service with the RAF. It would carry the same weapons - laser guided antitank missiles or smartbombs - and similar sensors. Mantis is said to be somewhat bigger, however, and to be able to fly at 55,000 feet as opposed to the Reaper's 50,000.

New special sauces claimed by BAE for the Mantis include onboard processing of sensor information, which could save significant quantities of bandwidth, and largely-autonomous flight controls which would save on expensive pilots sitting in remote control stations.

Both technologies are already available in other machines, however. The latest Predators, produced for the US Army and so unaffected by the US air force's insistence on using fully-qualified human pilots as much as possible, are operated by comparatively cheap tech specialists just as Mantis would be. Onboard processing of data-heavy sensor output is already routine in much more basic aircraft. And far from being at the cutting edge of drone tech, Mantis is already being eclipsed by such recent offerings as the Avenger.

There can be little doubt that if the British forces purchase Mantis, they will pay more for a given level of capability than they would if they continued to buy Predators or other foreign-made products.

Should Labour be re-elected next year it would seem very likely that the RAF will be ordered to buy Mantis nonetheless, as Lord Drayson - one of the British arms industry's staunchest friends in government - has lately returned to the MoD with an anomalous portfolio which makes him effectively equal in rank to the Secretary of State for Defence.

However a decision on whether or not to discard Reaper and switch to Mantis appears unlikely before the UK's strategic defence review next year, which all parties have agreed should follow the election.

Rival drone makers have hinted that the UK MoD - known to be strapped for cash - can't realistically afford to pay British industry to reinvent other people's wheels yet again.

Air Vice-Marshal Simon Bollom, speaking for the MoD, remained non-committal today.

"These trials at the end of this technology demonstration programme have helped build confidence in the feasibility of a UK-derived unmanned aerial system," he said. ®

Intelligent flash storage arrays

More from The Register

next story
Scrapping the Human Rights Act: What about privacy and freedom of expression?
Justice minister's attack to destroy ability to challenge state
WHY did Sunday Mirror stoop to slurping selfies for smut sting?
Tabloid splashes, MP resigns - but there's a BIG copyright issue here
Google hits back at 'Dear Rupert' over search dominance claims
Choc Factory sniffs: 'We're not pirate-lovers - also, you publish The Sun'
EU to accuse Ireland of giving Apple an overly peachy tax deal – report
Probe expected to say single-digit rate was unlawful
Inequality increasing? BOLLOCKS! You heard me: 'Screw the 1%'
There's morality and then there's economics ...
Hey Brit taxpayers. You just spent £4m on Central London ‘innovation playground’
Catapult me a Mojito, I feel an Digital Innovation coming on
While you queued for an iPhone 6, Apple's Cook sold shares worth $35m
Right before the stock took a 3.8% dive amid bent and broken mobe drama
EU probes Google’s Android omerta again: Talk now, or else
Spill those Android secrets, or we’ll fine you
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.