Feeds

Android's delicate guts ripped apart

Screws, and then some

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

Photos Sure, plenty of people have cracked the iPhone's software, but the Droid's hardware? That's a different matter.

Motorola's engineers have worked hard to make their debut Android-powered phone as delicate - and difficult - to deconstruct as possible.

The tear-down crew at PhoneWreck got to grips with this Google-powered midget, though, to give you a glimpse at its delicate insides.

You can check out the full deconstruction at phonewreck.com, or take an expedited trip with us through the hardware.

After removing the back cover and battery, it's screw and fiddle city: with your T6, remove both the silver and black screws from the rear of the chassis that hold holds the PCB and the back plate on the screen portion of the device in place.

Droid teardown1

Motorola's Droid gets a probing

Finding the next set of screws presents a challenge: they are hidden beneath the plastic piece above the Google label at the very back of the phone. To access them, you need a pin or other small prying device - but be careful, as the plastic pieces tend to be slightly brittle. Once you find the screws, remove them

Another screw is hidden underneath the Google label and lens cover - which needs to be removed. But even this isn't the frustrating part - that's next, with the final three screws.

Droid teardown5

Spot the screw: hidden beneath the Google label and camera lens cover

Your last three screws are hidden beneath the fake-gold grating that covers the bottom of the battery door. To get at them, you'll need to bring your pin back into play to pry up the grating. Once in, look for the heavily disguised screws and yank them out to free the Droid's PCB. After you've done that, use your wedge to pry out the clips on the back of the Droid's frame.

Droid teardown2

Fake-gold foil yields its hidden screws

Next, you need to remove one final silver T6 screw used to lock down the logic board. Once that's out the way, you can pop off the flex cables used to connect the device to the screen, and then you can flip away the PCB and remove the remaining flex cable.

Droid teardown3

Pop off the flex cables to separate device from screen

Once you're free of the PCB you can remove the screen and Droid's slider mechanism simply by pulling at the back plastic frame used to create the phone's upper border. The slider mechanism is simplicity itself - essentially just two rails that are embedded within the screen portion of the device.

Droid teardown4

Insides out: the Droid's bits on display

As you can see, there's not much to the Droid under the covers, but getting there proved a worthy test of observation and finger size. A worthy adversary, the Droid, but ultimately no match fro the PhoneWreck folks. ®

Intelligent flash storage arrays

More from The Register

next story
Xperia Z3: Crikey, Sony – ANOTHER flagship phondleslab?
The Fourth Amendment... and it IS better
Don't wait for that big iPad, order a NEXUS 9 instead, industry little bird says
Google said to debut next big slab, Android L ahead of Apple event
Microsoft to enter the STRUGGLE of the HUMAN WRIST
It's not just a thumb war, it's total digit war
Chipmaker FTDI bricking counterfeit kit
USB-serial imitators whacked by driver update
A drone of one's own: Reg buyers' guide for UAV fanciers
Hardware: Check. Software: Huh? Licence: Licence...?
The Apple launch AS IT HAPPENED: Totally SERIOUS coverage, not for haters
Fandroids, Windows Phone fringe-oids – you wouldn't understand
Apple SILENCES Bose, YANKS headphones from stores
The, er, Beats go on after noise-cancelling spat
prev story

Whitepapers

Cloud and hybrid-cloud data protection for VMware
Learn how quick and easy it is to configure backups and perform restores for VMware environments.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Three 1TB solid state scorchers up for grabs
Big SSDs can be expensive but think big and think free because you could be the lucky winner of one of three 1TB Samsung SSD 840 EVO drives that we’re giving away worth over £300 apiece.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.